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I have a base class with the following (trimmed for brevity) declaration:

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{    
  public int RecordId { get; private set; }
  public string ObjectName { get; set; }
  public abstract string Status { get; set; }

  public GetMyObject(int id)
  {
     MyObject myObject = context.GetObjectById(id);
     this.RecordId = myObject.RecordId;
     this.ObjectName = myObject.ObjectName;
     this.Status = myObject.Status
  }
}

Which is used by the following class:

public class MySpecificClass : MyBaseClass
{
   public override string Status
   {
      get
      {
         if(this.Status == "something")
           return "some status";
         else
           return "some other status";
      }
      set
      {
         this.Status = value;
      }
   }

   public GetMySpecificObject(int id) : base(id)
   {
   }
} 

Now when I bind my specific object to my model (my implementation happens to be MVC) the object is returned just fine if I only access the RecordID and the ObjectName, but I get a stack overflow exception if the get or set accessors to my (overridden) Status is hit.

I found a similar question on SO already...

New to C#, why does Property Set throw StackOverflow exception?

... but going by the auto-property implementation, my code looks like it would be correct and not create an infinite loop (but this does appear to be the case). Any ideas on how I would correctly override that property?

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

The setter in MySpecificClass shouldn't be a problem, but the getter definitely is - internally, a call to an instance of MySpecificClass's Status will be making a call to itself to see which value to return which will make a call to itself to see... well. You get the idea.

I'd use a protected class variable rather than an auto-property.

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    protected string _status;
    public virtual string Status
    {
        get { return _status; }
        set { _status = value; } 
    }
}

public class MySpecificClass : MyBaseClass
{
    public override string Status
    {
        get
        {
            if(_status == "something")
                return "some status";
            else
                return "some other status";
        }
        set
        {
            _status = value;
        }
    }
}
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Attempting to make the change to a protected class variable throws the following compile time error on the get and set lines: "Cannot declare a body because it is marked abstract" –  Justin Aug 24 '09 at 19:22
    
I should have declared the base property as a virtual instead of an abstract. –  48klocs Aug 24 '09 at 19:33
    
That got it, thanks klocks! –  Justin Aug 24 '09 at 19:40

This is "By Design".

In the setter of Status you are calling this.Status = value. Status is a virtual property and hence it will bind right back to the setter of MySpecificClass.Status.

If you want to access the base property use base. instead

base.Status = value;
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@JaredPar: can base.Status be used, when it is abstract? –  shahkalpesh Aug 24 '09 at 18:58
    
@shahkalpesh: abstract just means that you can't create the base class itself. However, all derived classes still "contains" the abstract base class, so all its members are there. –  Brian Rasmussen Aug 24 '09 at 19:02
    
@Brian: Please help me understand, how can base.Status be used when it is declared abstract. I think, either I am missing something or I need to learn c# fundamentals. –  shahkalpesh Aug 24 '09 at 19:14
    
In my getter if I change this.Status to base.Status I get the following complile time error "Cannot call an abstract base member". From the setter I cannot access base.Status (intelli-crack doesnt like it). –  Justin Aug 24 '09 at 19:17
    
@shahkalpesh, I believe you are correct. But I appreciate your effort Brian :) –  Justin Aug 24 '09 at 19:18

The abstract property declaration in the base class just states: "derived classes MUST implement a property called Status, with a getter and setter". In your derived class, calling this.Status inside your getter is illegal (causes the stack overflow).

To fix this, use a property with a backing field in your derived class:

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    public abstract string Status { get; set; }
}


public class MySpecificClass : MyBaseClass
{
   private string _status;
   public override string Status
   {
       get
       {
          if(this._status == "something")
            return "some status";
          else
            return "some other status";
       }
       set
       {
           _status = value;
       }
   }

}
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Where is the backing variable for Status property?

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The backing variable isn't declared since I was using C# 3.0's auto property feature. –  Justin Aug 24 '09 at 19:19
    
@Justin: Yes but it will be required, if you are basing your decision off it. Either there should be a base class property (non-abstract) OR there should be a backing variable, AFAIK. –  shahkalpesh Aug 24 '09 at 19:20

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