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I have the following code:

import string
def translate_non_alphanumerics(to_translate, translate_to='_'):
    not_letters_or_digits = u'!"#%\'()*+,-./:;<=>?@[\]^_`{|}~'
    translate_table = string.maketrans(not_letters_or_digits,
                                       translate_to
                                         *len(not_letters_or_digits))
    return to_translate.translate(translate_table)

Which works great for non-unicode strings:

>>> translate_non_alphanumerics('<foo>!')
'_foo__'

But fails for unicode strings:

>>> translate_non_alphanumerics(u'<foo>!')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in translate_non_alphanumerics
TypeError: character mapping must return integer, None or unicode

I can't make any sense of the paragraph on "Unicode objects" in the Python 2.6.2 docs for the str.translate() method.

How do I make this work for Unicode strings?

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5 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The Unicode version of translate requires a mapping from Unicode ordinals (which you can retrieve for a single character with ord) to Unicode ordinals. If you want to delete characters, you map to None.

I changed your function to build a dict mapping the ordinal of every character to the ordinal of what you want to translate to:

def translate_non_alphanumerics(to_translate, translate_to=u'_'):
    not_letters_or_digits = u'!"#%\'()*+,-./:;<=>?@[\]^_`{|}~'
    translate_table = dict((ord(char), translate_to) for char in not_letters_or_digits)
    return to_translate.translate(translate_table)

>>> translate_non_alphanumerics(u'<foo>!')
u'_foo__'

edit: It turns out that the translation mapping must map from the Unicode ordinal (via ord) to either another Unicode ordinal, a Unicode string, or None (to delete). I have thus changed the default value for translate_to to be a Unicode literal. For example:

>>> translate_non_alphanumerics(u'<foo>!', u'bad')
u'badfoobadbad'
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3  
Thank you! (Such a dumb design decision to have an identically named function that operates differently.) –  Sabuncu May 11 '12 at 15:03
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In this version you can relatively make one's letters to other

def trans(to_translate):
    tabin = u'привет'
    tabout = u'тевирп'
    tabin = [ord(char) for char in tabin]
    translate_table = dict(zip(tabin, tabout))
    return to_translate.translate(translate_table)
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Instead of having to specify all the characters that need to be replaced, you could also view it the other way around and, instead, specify only the valid characters, like so:

import re

def replace_non_alphanumerics(source, replacement_character='_'):
    result = re.sub("[^_a-zA-Z0-9]", replacement_character, source)

    return result

This works with unicode as well as regular strings, and preserves the type (if both the replacement_character and the source are of the same type, obviously).

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I came up with the following combination of my original function and Mike's version that works with Unicode and ASCII strings:

def translate_non_alphanumerics(to_translate, translate_to=u'_'):
    not_letters_or_digits = u'!"#%\'()*+,-./:;<=>?@[\]^_`{|}~'
    if isinstance(to_translate, unicode):
        translate_table = dict((ord(char), unicode(translate_to))
                               for char in not_letters_or_digits)
    else:
        assert isinstance(to_translate, str)
        translate_table = string.maketrans(not_letters_or_digits,
                                           translate_to
                                              *len(not_letters_or_digits))
    return to_translate.translate(translate_table)

Update: "coerced" translate_to to unicode for the unicode translate_table. Thanks Mike.

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I would suggest that you coerce the translate_to into Unicode for the Unicode version, otherwise the translate call will freak out if you pass it a Unicode string, and "normal" string. –  Mike Boers Aug 24 '09 at 19:40
    
This seems like something that should be part of the language. +1 –  bukzor Apr 24 '10 at 16:39
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For a simple hack that will work on both str and unicode objects, convert the translation table to unicode before running translate():

import string
def translate_non_alphanumerics(to_translate, translate_to='_'):
    not_letters_or_digits = u'!"#%\'()*+,-./:;<=>?@[\]^_`{|}~'
    translate_table = string.maketrans(not_letters_or_digits,
                                       translate_to
                                         *len(not_letters_or_digits))
    translate_table = translate_table.decode("latin-1")
    return to_translate.translate(translate_table)

The catch here is that it will implicitly convert all str objects to unicode, throwing errors if to_translate contains non-ascii characters.

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