Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to append each column of file 1 as the 4th column of file 2 and export as a new file with the column number from file 1 or something similar as the output name.

Input File 1 and 2 have the same number of rows:

Input File 1 has N columns:

12 23 34  .....
33 34 23
67 09 34
45 67 34
65 76 44
64 33 96

Input File 2 originally has 5 columns

AA BB FF DD 6
AA CC HH NN 7
AA DD II RR 4
AA EE JJ PP 2
AA FF KK QQ 9
AA GG LL SS 8

For example, the first 3 output files would look like this:

Output File 1 (column 1):

AA BB FF 12 DD 6
AA CC HH 33 NN 7
AA DD II 67 RR 4
AA EE JJ 45 PP 2
AA FF KK 65 QQ 9
AA GG LL 64 SS 8

Output File 2 (column 2):

AA BB FF 23 DD 6
AA CC HH 34 NN 7
AA DD II 09 RR 4
AA EE JJ 67 PP 2
AA FF KK 76 QQ 9
AA GG LL 33 SS 8

Output File 3 (column 3):

AA BB FF 34 DD 6
AA CC HH 23 NN 7
AA DD II 34 RR 4
AA EE JJ 34 PP 2
AA FF KK 44 QQ 9
AA GG LL 96 SS 8

The new file names can be file1, file2, file3...or column1, column2, column3....or something similar. How can I achieve this please? (for loop, awk, paste, etc.)

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Most tools like "awk" and "sed" are used like "pipes": INPUT => PROCESSING => OUTPUT. The problem is that you've got multiple streams you want to process on a per-line basis. Frankly, I'd use something like Perl or Python (or even C), then just open two files. IMHO... –  paulsm4 Nov 5 '12 at 21:39
    
Thanks for your reply, and I've heard people were using python to do the same formatting thing. Since I'm very new to python, could you give me an example on the above question please? –  user1687130 Nov 5 '12 at 22:18
    
@paulsm4: it doesn't matter to awk if it's input is coming from a pipe or a file and it can handle multiple files with or without a pipe just fine. cat file1 | awk '{print}' - file2 file3 for example would print the contents of all 3 files. –  Ed Morton Nov 6 '12 at 13:28
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your columns are tab-separated, you can easily profit from cut and paste:

for i in {1..N} ; do  # Insert the real N here, or change to $(seq 1 $N)
    cut -f1-3 input2 | \
        paste - \
              <(cut -f$i input1) \
              <(cut -f4- input2) \
        > output$i
done
share|improve this answer
    
It works! Thank you! –  user1687130 Nov 5 '12 at 22:21
add comment

This method processes each file only once, which is a help if the files are large. It does, however, require the first file to be stored in memory:

awk '
    NR==1 {n=NF} 
    NR==FNR {
        for (i=1; i<=n; i++) 
            file1[i, FNR]=$i
        next
    }
    {
        for (i=1; i<=n; i++) {
            filename = "merged" i
            print $1, $2, $3, file1[i, FNR], $4, $5 >> filename
        }
    }
' file1 file2
share|improve this answer
add comment

Something like this is all you need:

awk '
NR==FNR { hd=$1" "$2" "$3"; tl=$4" "$5; next }
{  for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {
      print hd, $i, tl > "file" i
   }
}
' file2 file1
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.