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I have a query I'm running in MySQL. As you can see, every part of the query is on indexed fields. Nevertheless, the query takes forever (tens of minutes, longer than I'm willing to wait). The Connect tables consist of two integers and two indexes (one field one, field two, the other field two, field one). Source and target are tables with a single indexed int field. Given all the indexes, I expected this query to finish in seconds. Any suggestions on 1: why it's taking so long, and 2: how to make it faster?

Thanks!

mysql> explain 
SELECT DISTINCT geneConnect.geneSymbolID FROM SNPEffectGeneConnector AS geneConnect 
  JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS snpEConnect ON geneConnect.snpEffectID = snpEConnect.snpEffectID 
  JOIN InDels2 AS source ON source.id = snpEConnect.indelID 
  WHERE geneConnect.geneSymbolID NOT IN (
    SELECT geneConnect.geneSymbolID FROM SNPEffectGeneConnector AS geneConnect 
    JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS snpEConnect ON geneConnect.snpEffectID = snpEConnect.snpEffectID 
    JOIN InDels3 AS target ON target.id = snpEConnect.indelID);
+----+--------------------+-------------+-------+-------------------+----------+---------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+------+--------------------------------+
| id | select_type        | table       | type  | possible_keys     | key      | key_len | ref                                                                   | rows | Extra                          |
+----+--------------------+-------------+-------+-------------------+----------+---------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+------+--------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY            | source      | index | id                | id       | 4       | NULL                                                                  | 5771 | Using index; Using temporary   |
|  1 | PRIMARY            | snpEConnect | ref   | snpEList          | snpEList | 4       | treattablebrowser.source.id                                           |    2 | Using index                    |
|  1 | PRIMARY            | geneConnect | ref   | snpEList          | snpEList | 4       | treattablebrowser.snpEConnect.snpEffectID                             |    1 | Using where; Using index       |
|  2 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | geneConnect | ref   | snpEList,geneList | geneList | 4       | func                                                                  |    1 | Using index                    |
|  2 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | target      | index | id                | id       | 4       | NULL                                                                  | 6297 | Using index; Using join buffer |
|  2 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | snpEConnect | ref   | snpEList          | snpEList | 8       | treattablebrowser.target.id,treattablebrowser.geneConnect.snpEffectID |    1 | Using index                    |
+----+--------------------+-------------+-------+-------------------+----------+---------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+------+--------------------------------+

6 rows in set (0.01 sec)

share|improve this question
    
try using another join instead of the IN() clause. In is super slow. – nathan hayfield Nov 5 '12 at 22:02
    
It's actually not the IN that is slow, per se, it's doing IN against a pool of items that aren't indexed. Doing IN against an indexed table is quite fast. – Greg Dougherty Nov 7 '12 at 15:15

I guess this is largely of academic interest now Greg's solved it himself. It's nice to know my intuition about these things can completely break. I can still rewrite this in three ways. The first I thought could be simplified, but as Greg pointed out, the simplification doesn't work. Not sure if this will be any quicker than the original, although it does produce a different query plan in my tests on sql server.

Select Distinct
    g1.geneSymbolID 
From
    SNPEffectGeneConnector AS g1 
        Inner Join
    IndelSNPEffectConnector AS s1 
        ON g1.snpEffectID = s1.snpEffectID 
        Inner Join
    InDels2 AS i2 ON i2.id = s1.indelID 
Where Not Exists (
    Select 'x'
        From
            SNPEffectGeneConnector As g2
                Inner Join
            IndelSNPEffectConnector AS s2 
                On g2.snpEffectID = s2.snpEffectID 
                Inner Join
            InDels3 As i3
                On i3.id = s2.indelID
        Where
            g2.geneSymbolID = g1.geneSymbolID
    );

I'm not 100% sure about the second way, but it works on my very small amount of test data. It has a much shorter query plan if it works (not necessarily faster, but a good indication):

Select
  geneSymbolID
From
  SNPEffectGeneConnector As g
    Inner Join 
  IndelSNPEffectConnector As s
    ON g.snpEffectID = s.snpEffectID 
    Left Outer Join
  InDels2 As i2 
    On i2.id = s.indelID 
    Left Outer Join
  InDels3 As i3
    On i3.id = s.indelID
Group By
    geneSymbolID
Having
    count(i2.id) > 0 And
    count(i3.id) = 0

Another approach (apologies for the non-descriptive aliases):

Select
    g.geneSymbolID
From
    SNPEffectGeneConnector As g
        Inner Join
    IndelSNPEffectConnector AS s
        On g.snpEffectID = s.snpEffectID 
        Inner Join (
        Select 
            i2.id,
            0 As c
        From    
            InDels2 i2
        Union All
        Select
            i3.id,
            1
        From
            InDels3 i3
    ) as i23
    on s.indelID = i23.id
Group By
    g.geneSymbolID
Having
    max(i23.c) = 0;

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/944e1/10

share|improve this answer
    
Can't do that because can't match on indel Id, have to match on gene ID. – Greg Dougherty Nov 7 '12 at 3:27
    
Could you supply some test data where this produces a different result to your query, please? – Laurence Nov 7 '12 at 10:16
    
I expect that the following data would let the value in InDels2 through, when it shouldn't. No? InDels2(source): 1; InDels3(target): 2; IndelSNPEffectConnector (snpEConnect): 1:55; 2:88; SNPEffectGeneConnector: 55:100; 88:100; – Greg Dougherty Nov 7 '12 at 15:21
    
@GregDougherty Thanks for that, updated with different queries, and a link to a fiddle with your test data in. Good lesson for me. – Laurence Nov 7 '12 at 16:39
    
+1. Your second suggestion wouldn't need to check for having count(i2.id) > 0 if you changed Left Outer Join InDels2 to Inner Join InDels2, though. – Andriy M Nov 8 '12 at 13:17
    SELECT DISTINCT geneConnect.geneSymbolID 
    FROM SNPEffectGeneConnector AS geneConnect 
      JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS snpEConnect 
          ON geneConnect.snpEffectID = snpEConnect.snpEffectID 
      JOIN InDels2 AS source ON source.id = snpEConnect.indelID
      LEFT OUTER JOIN InDels3 AS target ON target.id = snpEConnect.indelID
    WHERE target.id is null

The above query should be equivalent to yours and give you much better performance.

share|improve this answer
    
target needs to link against its own IndelSNPEffectConnector, since I do NOT want to limit results to matching indel IDs. – Greg Dougherty Nov 7 '12 at 3:30

It turns out that the problem was that while everything has indexes, the gene IDs returned by the subquery do not have an index. Joining / doing an IN search against a non-indexed collection of numbers has really bad performance, which is what I got.

My solution was to do the outer and inner JOINs separately, dumping the results into two different indexed tables, then deleting the geneIDs in 1 that were also in 2.

The moral of the story: never JOIN or IN against an unindexed collection of anything.

share|improve this answer
    
The solution is: never use IN; instead use a correlated subquery, using EXISTS (select * FROM x) , or the equivalent JOIN x ... WHERE x.y IS NULL. – wildplasser Nov 7 '12 at 16:00

If I have understood correctly, you want to find all geneSymbolID's in SNPEffectGeneConnector having entries in IndelSNPEffectConnector, so that they do have matches (on indelID) in InDels2 but do not have corresponding matches with that same indelID in InDels3.

Then you may run the first part of the query (the "do" part), and then further join the last part, and thus gather all genes for which there is a match. A LEFT JOIN with the gene symbol table imposing a matching failure would then yield all genes that fail the reverse criterion, and therefore are of interest.

Revised answer

This is the query that matches:

SELECT DISTINCT genes.geneSymbolID
FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT geneSymbolID FROM SNPEffectGeneConnector ) AS genes
JOIN SNPEffectGeneConnector AS effectSource
    ON ( genes.geneSymbolID = effectSource.geneSymbolID)
JOIN SNPEffectGeneConnector AS effectTarget
    ON ( genes.geneSymbolID = effectTarget.geneSymbolID)
JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS indelSource
    ON ( indelSource.snpEffectID = effectSource.snpEffectID )
JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS indelTarget
    ON ( indelTarget.snpEffectID = effectTarget.snpEffectID ) 
     JOIN InDels2 ON ( indelSource.indelId = InDels2.id )
     JOIN InDels3 ON ( indelTarget.indelId = InDels3.id )
;

Now, for this query I think you would need these indexes:

CREATE INDEX SNPEffectGeneConnector_ndx
    ON SNPEffectGeneConnector(snpEffectID, geneSymbolID);

CREATE INDEX SNPEffectGeneConnector_ndx2
    ON SNPEffectGeneConnector(geneSymbolID);

CREATE INDEX IndelSNPEffectConnector_ndx
    ON IndelSNPEffectConnector(snpEffectID, indelID);
CREATE [UNIQUE?] INDEX InDels2_ndx ON InDels2(id); -- unless id is primary key
CREATE [UNIQUE?] INDEX InDels3_ndx ON InDels3(id); -- unless id is primary key

To get the genes of interest:

SELECT glob.geneSymbolID
    FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT geneSymbolID FROM SNPEffectGeneConnector ) AS glob
    LEFT JOIN (
SELECT DISTINCT genes.geneSymbolID
FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT geneSymbolID FROM SNPEffectGeneConnector ) AS genes
JOIN SNPEffectGeneConnector AS effectSource
    ON ( genes.geneSymbolID = effectSource.geneSymbolID)
JOIN SNPEffectGeneConnector AS effectTarget
    ON ( genes.geneSymbolID = effectTarget.geneSymbolID)
JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS indelSource
    ON ( indelSource.snpEffectID = effectSource.snpEffectID )
JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS indelTarget
    ON ( indelTarget.snpEffectID = effectTarget.snpEffectID ) 
     JOIN InDels2 ON ( indelSource.indelId = InDels2.id )
     JOIN InDels3 ON ( indelTarget.indelId = InDels3.id )
) AS fits ON (glob.geneSymbolID = fits.geneSymbolID)
WHERE fits.geneSymbolID IS NULL;

Test

CREATE TABLE InDels2 ( id integer );
INSERT INTO InDels2 VALUES ( 1 );
CREATE TABLE InDels3 ( id integer );
INSERT INTO InDels3 VALUES ( 2 );
CREATE TABLE IndelSNPEffectConnector ( indelId integer, snpEffectID integer );
INSERT INTO IndelSNPEffectConnector VALUES ( 1, 55 ), ( 2, 88 );
CREATE TABLE SNPEffectGeneConnector ( geneSymbolID integer, snpEffectID integer );
INSERT INTO SNPEffectGeneConnector VALUES ( 100, 55 ), ( 100, 88 );

So since gene 100 is connected to 55 which is connected to 1 and thus noted in ID2, but it is also connected to 88 which is connected to 2 and thus in ID3, it must NOT appear.

What would appear? If I have understood the requirements, we need a gene, causing an effect, whose indel is not listed in inDels3. So, say, gene 42, causing effect 77, linked to indel 3 which is not present in inDels3, would have to appear.

So:

INSERT INTO SNPEffectGeneConnector VALUES ( 42, 55 );
INSERT INTO SNPEffectGeneConnector VALUES ( 42, 77 );
INSERT INTO IndelSNPEffectConnector VALUES ( 3, 77 );

yields

+--------------+
| geneSymbolID |
+--------------+
|           42 |
+--------------+

A modification of the first query may be used to inspect why 42 goes, and 100 doesn't:

SELECT genes.geneSymbolID, effectSource.snpEffectID, effectTarget.snpEffectID, indelSource.indelId AS sourceInDel, indelTarget.indelId AS targetInDel, InDels3.id
FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT geneSymbolID FROM SNPEffectGeneConnector ) AS genes
 JOIN SNPEffectGeneConnector AS effectSource
     ON ( genes.geneSymbolID = effectSource.geneSymbolID)
 JOIN SNPEffectGeneConnector AS effectTarget
     ON ( genes.geneSymbolID = effectTarget.geneSymbolID)
 JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS indelSource
     ON ( indelSource.snpEffectID = effectSource.snpEffectID )
 JOIN IndelSNPEffectConnector AS indelTarget
     ON ( indelTarget.snpEffectID = effectTarget.snpEffectID )

      JOIN InDels2 ON ( indelSource.indelId = InDels2.id )
 LEFT JOIN InDels3 ON ( indelTarget.indelId = InDels3.id );

+--------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+------+
| geneSymbolID | snpEffectID | snpEffectID | sourceInDel | targetInDel | id   |
+--------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+------+
|           42 |          55 |          55 |           1 |           1 | NULL |
|           42 |          55 |          77 |           1 |           3 | NULL |
|          100 |          55 |          55 |           1 |           1 | NULL |
|          100 |          55 |          88 |           1 |           2 |    2 |
+--------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+------+

...100 has a line whose InDels3's ID is not null, and it reports target indel 2.

share|improve this answer
    
The indexes already existed. What I'm looking for is where there are different indel IDs that have the same gene ID. So this doesn't work. – Greg Dougherty Nov 7 '12 at 3:29
    
Can you supply, say, three rows from each of the four tables - just the IDs - and a sample of desired output for those rows? I'm quite confident something can be worked out. – lserni Nov 7 '12 at 9:45
    
See my comment to Laurence above. In my case at least, the problem was easily solved by dumping the gene IDs into an indexed table, and using that table, which took the query from over 30 minutes (that was where I gave up) to 7 seconds. – Greg Dougherty Nov 7 '12 at 15:26
    
I see, I hadn't thought this over. The required query is more complicated. I'm happy you solved, but could I ask you to try this new solution? Given the added queries I needed, I'm not too hopeful about the performances, but I am still curious. – lserni Nov 7 '12 at 17:01

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