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How do we space out media queries accurately to avoid overlap?

For example, if we consider the code:

@media (max-width: 20em) {
    /* for narrow viewport */
}

@media (min-width: 20em) and (max-width: 45em) {
    /* slightly wider viewport */
}

@media (min-width: 45em) {
    /* everything else */
}

What will happen, across all supporting browsers, at exactly 20em, and 45em?

I've seen people use: things like 799px and then 800px, but what about a screen width of 799.5 px? (Obviously not on a regular display, but a retina one?)


I'm most curious about the answer here considering the spec.

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1  
Your current question title doesn't seem to match what you're asking. It seems like the first line of your question content would fit better as the title :) – BoltClock Nov 28 '12 at 17:35
    
@BoltClock, thanks as always — I switched them around; but how did you interpret "spacing out media queries"? – Baumr Nov 28 '12 at 17:39
1  
@Baumr: Good question - I don't quite fully understand what you mean by that, actually. The rest of the question I understand and I'm writing an answer. – BoltClock Nov 28 '12 at 17:42
1  
I would assume that if you had a width of exactly 20em, then it would first apply the max-width: 20em definitions, then also apply the min-width: 20em definitions. – Quantastical Nov 28 '12 at 17:46
1  
@Baumr, I believe it is just cascading the same as general CSS declarations. Since a width of 20em satisfies both queries, both of the query definitions are going to be applied. – Quantastical Nov 28 '12 at 17:56
up vote 46 down vote accepted

What are the rules for CSS media query overlap?

Cascade.

@media rules are transparent to the cascade, so when two or more @media rules match at the same time, the browser should apply the styles in all the rules that match, and resolve the cascade accordingly.1

What will happen, across all supporting browsers, at exactly 20em, and 45em?

At exactly 20em wide, your first and second media query will both match. Browsers will apply styles in both @media rules and cascade accordingly, so if there are any conflicting rules that need to be overridden, the last-declared one wins (accounting for specific selectors, !important, etc). Likewise for the second and third media query when the viewport is exactly 45em wide.

Considering your example code, with some actual style rules added:

@media (max-width: 20em) {
    .sidebar { display: none; }
}

@media (min-width: 20em) and (max-width: 45em) {
    .sidebar { display: block; float: left; }
}

When the browser viewport is exactly 20em wide, both of these media queries will return true. By the cascade, display: block overrides display: none and float: left will apply on any element with the class .sidebar.

You can think of it as applying rules as if the media queries weren't there to begin with:

.sidebar { display: none; }
.sidebar { display: block; float: left; }

Another example of how the cascade takes place when a browser matches two or more media queries can be found in this other answer.

Be warned, though, that if you have declarations that don't overlap in both @media rules, then all of those rules will apply. What happens here is a union of the declarations in both @media rules, not just the latter completely overruling the former... which brings us to your earlier question:

How do we space out media queries accurately to avoid overlap?

If you wish to avoid overlap, you simply need to write media queries that are mutually exclusive.

Remember that the min- and max- prefixes mean "minimum inclusive" and "maximum inclusive"; this means (min-width: 20em) and (max-width: 20em) will both match a viewport that is exactly 20em wide.

It looks like you already have an example, which brings us to your last question:

I've seen people use: things like 799px and then 800px, but what about a screen width of 799.5 px? (Obviously not on a regular display, but a retina one?)

This I'm not entirely sure; all pixel values in CSS are logical pixels, and I've been hard pressed to find a browser that would report a fractional pixel value for a viewport width. I've tried experimenting with some iframes but haven't been able to come up with anything.

From my experiments it would seem Safari on iOS rounds all fractional pixel values to ensure that either one of max-width: 799px and min-width: 800px will match, even if the viewport is really 799.5px (which apparently matches the former).


1 Although none of this is explicitly stated in either the Conditional Rules module or the Cascade module (the latter of which is currently slated for a rewrite), the cascade is implied to take place normally, since the spec simply says to apply styles in any and all @media rules that match the browser or media.

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Done and dusted, thanks BoltClock! – Baumr Nov 28 '12 at 18:03
    
@Baumr: No problem, although I wasn't quite done yet - I'd missed your question about overlapping media queries. I've updated my answer, and with that I'm calling it a night. Oh and just for kicks: media queries are one of my favorite topics in CSS, but I can't stand the term RWD ;) – BoltClock Nov 28 '12 at 18:19
    
BoltClock, it may have been the first time I used "RWD" actually — your cold reception has been noted, haha! Good night, but when you return, check out the update I made to the original question. Now to look at your update... – Baumr Nov 28 '12 at 18:37
    
BoltClock, should I take out that update and make it into its own question? I feel I am making this convoluted – Baumr Nov 28 '12 at 18:47
    
@Baumr: Yup, it's much better that way. – BoltClock Nov 29 '12 at 2:25

calc() can be used to work around this (min-width: 50em and max-width: calc(50em - 1px) will be correctly stacked), but browser support for it isn’t amazing.

@media (min-width: 20em) and (max-width: calc(45em - 1px)) {
    /* slightly wider viewport */
}

Infos:

Some others mentioned, not using the em unit would help in your queries stacking.

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