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I have a problem with my code (edit: whole code of these classes)

public abstract class SimplePolygon implements Polygon {

  //protected Vertex2D[] varray; //this is wrong in tests
  public double getWidth(){
    double min = varray[0].getX(), max = varray[0].getX();

    for(int i = 0;i<varray.length;i++){
        max = Math.max(max,varray[i].getX());
        min = Math.min(min,varray[i].getX());
    }
    return max - min;
  }

  public double getHeight(){
    double min = varray[0].getY(), max = varray[0].getY();

    for(int i = 0;i<varray.length;i++){
        max = Math.max(max,varray[i].getY());
        min = Math.min(min,varray[i].getY());
    }
    return max - min;
  }

  public double getLength(){
    double distance = 0;
    for(int i = 0;i<varray.length;i++){
        if((i+1)<varray.length){distance += varray[i].distance(varray[i+1]);}
        else{distance += varray[i].distance(varray[0]);}
    }

    return distance;
  }

  public double getArea(){
    double suma = 0;
    for(int i = 0;i<varray.length-1;i++){
        suma += varray[i].getX()*varray[i+1].getY() - varray[i+1].getX()*varray[i].getY();
    }
    return suma/2;
  }

  public String toString(){
    String str = "Polygon: vertices ="; 
    for(int i = 0;i<varray.length;i++){
        str += " ";
        str += varray[i];
    }
    return str;
  }
}

public class ArrayPolygon extends SimplePolygon {

  public ArrayPolygon(Vertex2D[] array){
    varray = new Vertex2D[array.length];
    if (array == null){}
    for(int i = 0;i<array.length;i++){
        if (array[i] == null){}
        varray[i] = array[i];
    }
  }

  public Vertex2D getVertex(int index) throws IllegalArgumentException{
    return varray[index];
  }

  public int getNumVertices(){
    return varray.length;
  }

}

Problem is, that i'm not allowed to add any attribute or method to abstract class SimplePolygon, so i can't properly initialize varray. It could simply be solved with protected attrib in that class, but for some (stupid) reason i can't do that. Has anybody an idea how to solve it without that? Thanks for all help.

share|improve this question
1  
What about putting the size in the abstract constructor and have the subclass call it when it gets constructed? – JustinKSU Nov 5 '12 at 22:46
1  
Either implement toString() in subclasses or call other abstract methods within toString() in SimplePolygon. – jlordo Nov 5 '12 at 22:47
    
What do you mean "initialize varray"? What is the relevance of your toString() method? – Bohemian Nov 5 '12 at 23:00
1  
Post the complete final code of the abstract class; specifying what was included in the assignment and what you added yourself. It seems you misunderstood the assignment, or this assignment is just crap. – ᴳᵁᴵᴰᴼ Nov 5 '12 at 23:05
    
Try to using reflection to set the attribute "varray" in your abstract class. – Sajan Chandran Nov 5 '12 at 23:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Think of:

  • your Polygon interface as java.util.List interface
  • your SimplePoygon abstract class as java.util.AbstractCollection
  • your ArrayPolygon concrete class as java.util.ArrayList

I think the point of your assignment is implementing a solution with an iterator, in that way you could implement generic methods about polygons in the abstract class, while hiding the actual data structure containing the data point in the concrete classes; so:

/* 
 *   This class implements generic methods about polygon, like size, area and 
 *   so on, leveraging on the Vertex2D iterator.
 */
public abstract class SimplePolygon implements Polygon {

    // all concrete subclasses must implement iterator
    public abstract Iterator<Vertex2D> iterator();

    // this generic method prints the vertex list
    // using iterator hides the data structure used in implementation
    public String toString() {
       Iterator<Vertex2D> it = iterator();
       if (! it.hasNext())
           return "[]";

       StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
       sb.append('Polygon: vertices = [');
       for (;;) {
           Vertex2D e = it.next();
           if (! it.hasNext())
               return sb.append("]").toString();
           sb.append(' ');
       }
    }
}

// for instance this concrete classes uses an ArrayList
public ArrayPolygon extends SimplePolygon {

    public Iterator<Vertex2D> iterator() {
       return new .....
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, this could be done without the abstract method. (Well, without specifying it in your code, but it just might satisfy the assignment constraint.) Make SimplePolygon implement Iterable<? extends Object>, then implement it in ArrayPolygon as Arrays.asList(varray).iterator(). That said, expecting students to come up with precisely this by only saying "no other methods" is rather silly, especially since the straightforward solution that adds an abstract method is pretty much equivalent. – millimoose Nov 6 '12 at 2:04

Firstly, this question has nothing to do with toString() - it's irrelevant.

Your question seems to be "How do I initialize varray from the subclass?".

One way to do it is to create a constructor in the super class:

public abstract class SimplePolygon implements Polygon {

    protected SimplePolygon(int size) { 
        varray = new Vertex2D[size]; // initialization by super class
    }

    protected SimplePolygon() {} // initialization totally by subclass

}

then call the constructor must suitable from the subclass:

public class ArrayPolygon extends SimplePolygon {

    public ArrayPolygon(Vertex2D[] array) {
        varray = array; // use default constructor and initialize it from parameter
    }
}

other subclasses can that don't have an array passed in can call the special constructor:

public class Square extends SimplePolygon {

    public Square() { // probably pass them in too
        super(4); // we know there's 4 vertices
    }
}


The question is general seems a bit pointless - it isn't clear what the goal of the exercise is.

share|improve this answer

If you need access to a subclass variable, you can expose that variable by forcing the subclass to expose it via a method.

public abstract class SimplePolygon implements Polygon {
  protected abstract Vertex2D[] getArray();

...

public String toString(){
    String str = "Polygon: vertices ="; 
    Vertex2D[] varray = getArray();
    for(int i = 0;i<varray.length;i++){
        str += " ";
        str += varray[i];
    }
    return str;
}

then in your class:

public class ArrayPolygon extends SimplePolygon
{
private Vertex2D[] varray;
public ArrayPolygon(Vertex2D[] array){
    super(array.length);
    varray = new Vertex2D[array.length];
    if (array == null){}
    for(int i = 0;i<array.length;i++){
        if (array[i] == null){}
        varray[i] = array[i];
    }

  @Override
  protected Vertex2D[] getArray() {return varray;}
  ...
}
share|improve this answer

I finaly realize where is the problem. Answer is very simply ... its enough to declare methods getVertex and getNumVertices as abstract in class SimplePolygon. These two methods provides more then enough info from varray. So the whole trick is to change varray.length and varray[n] to those methods. Thanks for your time and help.

share|improve this answer
    
Several people (me, guido, jlordo in comments) have given you an answer that involved adding abstract methods that you rejected and someone downvoted. It's only fair to accept one of those answers instead of posting your own that's substantially equivalent (yet lighter in content) to those you received. – millimoose Nov 7 '12 at 14:43
    
sorry, my first question there ... and i really want to tank everyone – franz9 Nov 8 '12 at 16:05

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