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I've looked at cppreference and they seem to indicate no noexcept specification on std::function(std::function&&). This seems rather odd to me. Does the Standard really not give a nothrow guarantee in this case?

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// 20.8.11.2.1, construct/copy/destroy: function() noexcept; function(nullptr_t) noexcept; function(const function&); function(function&&); - and the list goes on –  chris Nov 5 '12 at 23:05
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@chris: The move constructor does indeed not have a noexcept specification, as the OP claims. What was the point of your comment? –  Kerrek SB Nov 5 '12 at 23:10
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@KerrekSB, I was referencing the standard. I've seen a couple of missing details on the site before, so it's always a good idea to go to the roots for confirmation. –  chris Nov 5 '12 at 23:12

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I imagine that the function object is capable of storing an arbitrary, user-defined, callable object. When you move the function object, that contained, user-defined object is moved as well, and there are no guarantees that this can be done without exceptions.

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This seems likely, especially given the note at §20.8.11.2.1/5: "Implementations are encouraged to avoid the use of dynamically allocated memory for small callable objects, for example, where f’s target is an object holding only a pointer or reference to an object and a member function pointer." –  James McNellis Nov 5 '12 at 23:19
    
it may well be that the intent is to support callables that have throwing move constructors. but that is just speculation. for example, imagine reallocation of the buffer in a vector of such function objects, where an attempt is made to move the originals, and where in the middle somewhere one of them throws. oh dang, they can't guaranteed be moved back, and neither can we go forward. so the reallocation fails. a requirement of non-throwing move of the callable objects would have supported such general usage of function objects. which IMHO casts strong doubt on the assumption of intent. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 5 '12 at 23:21
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For std::vector, if nothrow move construction cannot be guaranteed, a copy is made instead, as there is no other way to make the exception guarantees. –  Puppy Nov 7 '12 at 17:29

Quoting the standard (as you request):

C++11 §20.8.11.2.1/6 (from N3290):
function(function&& f);
template function(allocator_arg_t, const A& a, function&& f);
Effects: If !f, *this has no target; otherwise, move-constructs the target of f into the target of *this, leaving f in a valid state with an unspecified value.

So, sorry, no noexcept on the move constructor.

There is a related Defect Report 2062 which is still open, but it goes in the other direction, so to speak, namely that there is at least one noexcept that apparently should not be there, for whatever the rationale of that is…

It may be that the intent is to support callables that have throwing move constructors. But that is just speculation in the direction of rationalization. For example, imagine reallocation of the buffer in a vector of such function objects, where an attempt is made to move the originals, and where in the middle somewhere one of them throws (I think this was the original example by Abrahams et.al). Oh dang, they can't guaranteed be moved back, and neither can we go forward. So the reallocation fails, and the operation that caused the reallocation, fails, with the vector in an invalid state. A requirement of non-throwing move of the callable objects would have supported such general usage of function objects, including optimized vector reallocation (etc.). Which IMHO makes it doubtful that the intent really has been to make this trade-off.

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