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I want to get the name of child under Version1 and Version 2. Examples below for name of child are "Customer" and "Invoice".

How would I get it using javascript?

I tried Errors.Version1.[0] to get name but that does not seem to work. I dont want to use Errors.Version1.Customer because it can change. It can be "Customer" or "Invoice". I just want to get whatever name it is.

Thanks!

JSON example

{
  "Errors": [
    {
      "Version1": {
        "Customer": {
          "BillAddr": {
            "Id": "Id1",
            "Line1": "Line11",
            "Line2": "Line21",
            "Line3": "Line31",
            "Line4": "Line41",
            "Line5": "Line51",
            "City": "City1",

          }
        }
      },
      "Version2": {
        "Invoice": {
          "BillAddr": {
            "Id": "Id1",
            "Line1": "Line11",
            "Line2": "Line21",
            "Line3": "Line31",
            "Line4": "Line41",
            "Line5": "Line51",
            "City": "City1",

          }
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If it can only ever be one or the other, then just do a simple test:

var type = ("Customer" in Errors[0].Version1) ? "Customer" : "Invoice",
    obj  = Errors[0].Version1[type];

If it's more dynamic than just those two possible results, then you need to do a for ... in iteration through the keys of the object.

That said, if you have 100% ownership of this data format, and the ability to change it, might I suggest removing one level, and instead giving the error an error_type property, rather than trying to guess it?

{
    Errors : [{
        Version1 : {
            ErrorType : "Customer",
            BillAddr : {
                Id    : "Id1",
                Line1 : "Line11",
                Line2 : "Line21",
                Line3 : "Line31",
                Line4 : "Line41",
                Line5 : "Line51",
                City  : "City1"
            }
        },

        Version2 : { /* ... */ }
    }]
}

Alternatively, you could make VersionX an array, rather than an object, and to that end, you could have multiple errors, held as objects (with their own error-type properties), at which point, figuring out what you're dealing with, through:

Errors[0].Version1[0].ErrorType;

becomes dead-simple.

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You can't reference object properties as indexes; in other words you can't do:

var foo = {a:1};
foo[0]; // Doesn't work

What you can do though is reference the property using a similar syntax as an index:

var foo = {a:1};
foo[someBoolean ? 'Customer' : 'Invoice']; // Does work

But, if you just want to get ANY properties of an object, regardless of what they're named? Well, then you need to iterate through them:

var foo = {randomName:1};
for (var key in foo) {
    // key=="randomName"
    // foo[key]==foo["randomName"]==foo.randomName==1
    // do whatever you want with foo[key];
}

However, I'd recommend using a library (both Underscore or jQuery have their own "each" functions) rather than the native JS, because if you use any libraries that add custom properties they could mess things up.

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1  
so then use foo.hasOwnProperty(key) to test if the property was inherited. –  David-SkyMesh Nov 5 '12 at 23:48
    
Just to be more specific about what machineghost is referring to and what David is protecting you against. Some libraries will enrich the native Object implementation like this: Object.prototype.anotherKey = "whatever". This is inconsiderate of other code and bad in my opinion, but, nevertheless, part of the language. –  cbayram Nov 5 '12 at 23:51
    
@cbayram this is how prototypal inheritance works and you can circumvent those properties being listed by setting their enumerable attribute to false. –  Christoph Nov 5 '12 at 23:53
    
@Christoph, this is true but recent ECMAScript 5 specification. When it comes to Object.defineProperty and given case, not all browsers support this ES5 spec http://kangax.github.com/es5-compat-table/, notably IE6, IE7 and IE8 –  cbayram Nov 6 '12 at 0:04
    
@David that works, but I still think using a library's each is the better way to go: not only do they give you "hasOwnProperty" checking "for free", they also give you a cleaner syntax, the whole host of benefits from the rest of the library, and (at least in Underscore's case) the benefits of native implementations when present, and cross-browser-compatible implementations when the browser doesn't have a native one. –  machineghost Nov 6 '12 at 0:29
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The correct notation would be

Errors[0].Version1[0] // however still won't work

Because you have an extra array wrapper in your json and you mixed notations.
However, object properties can't be accessed by their index, because their order is not guaranteed. So you either need to convert Version1 and Version2 to an array, or have to access the properties by name.

Errors[0].Version1["Customer"] //works for your current markup

Also, use either dot-Notation object.property or Bracket-Notation object["property"] - you can't mix it.

The following would work for your Notation Errors.Version1[0]:

{
  "Errors":
    {
      "Version1": [
        {
          "BillAddr": {
            "Id": "Id1",
            "Line1": "Line11",
            "Line2": "Line21",
            "Line3": "Line31",
            "Line4": "Line41",
            "Line5": "Line51",
            "City": "City1",

          }
        }
      ]
    }
}

As an array the order is guaranteed to be fixed, but you lose the information customer because arrays have no keys but only indices.

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