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I have perused numerous other solutions to NPEs, and I've tried to implement other suggestions, but none of them quite match up what I'm trying to do and it just leads to more eclipse errors. I have compiled and tried to run from the command line, giving the application I'm running a couple strings when running at the command line. Below is the main class, and the class containing the methods that the main is using.

Class with the main method:

package my.package.ext;



public class WordCounterApp {

    /**
     * @param args
     * Two command line arguments: the first one needs to be in quotes, the string that will be used, the second optional argument
     * is the unique word to be counted (countWord method).
     * @param source 
     * @param word 
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String source = null;
        String uniqueword = null;
        StringBuilder word = null;
        WordCounter counter = new WordCounter(source, word);
        WordCounter uniqueCounter = new WordCounter(source, uniqueword);
        counter.countWords(source);
        counter.countUniqueWords(source);
        uniqueCounter.countWord(source, uniqueword);

}

}

Class with the other methods:

package my.package.ext;
import java.util.*;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;
import java.lang.Character;
import java.lang.StringBuilder;

public class WordCounter {
    public Integer counter = 0;
    public String source;
    public HashSet<String> hashset;
    public StringBuilder word;
    public String uniqueword;

    public WordCounter(String source) {
         counter = new Integer(counter);
    }
    public WordCounter(String source, StringBuilder word) {
         counter = new Integer(counter);
    }
    public WordCounter(String source, String uniqueword) {
        counter = new Integer(counter);
    }
    /**
     *  
     * @param line - the string parameter to get a total word count from.
     */

    public int countWords(String source) {

        boolean word = false;
        int endOfLine = source.length() - 1;
        Integer counter = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < source.length(); i++) {
            if (Character.isLetter(source.charAt(i)) == true && i != endOfLine) {
                word = true;
            //} else if (Character.charValue(line.charAt(i)) == "-" && i != endOfLine) {
            //  word = true;
            } else if (Character.isLetter(source.charAt(i)) == false && word == true) {
                counter++;
                word = false;
            } else if (Character.isLetter(source.charAt(i)) && i == endOfLine) {
                counter++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(counter);
        return counter;
    }




/**
 * 
 * @param line - the string parameter that we will return the unique word count from. Randy recommends a HashSet.
 * Put it into a hashset. Hashsets don't allow duplicate elements. Then do a count. 
 */

    public int countUniqueWords(String line) {
        hashset = new HashSet<String>();
        word = new StringBuilder();
        int endOfLine = line.length() - 1;
        boolean isWord = false;
        String stringWord = null;
        Integer counter = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < line.length(); i++) {
            if (Character.isLetter(line.charAt(i)) == true && i != endOfLine) {
                //System.out.println(i);
                word.append(line.charAt(i));
                isWord = true;
            } else if (Character.isLetter(line.charAt(i)) == false && isWord == true) {
                counter++;
                //System.out.println("Counter is: " + counter);
                stringWord = word.toString();
                //System.out.println("stringWord is now: " + stringWord);
                hashset.add(stringWord);
                //System.out.println(hashset);
                word = new StringBuilder();
                isWord = false;
            } else if (Character.isLetter(line.charAt(i)) && i == endOfLine) {
                counter++;
                stringWord = word.toString();
                hashset.add(stringWord);
            }
        }
        //System.out.println(counter);
        System.out.println("There are " + hashset.size() + " unique words in this string");
        System.out.println("These are the unique words in the string: " + hashset);
        return counter;

    }


/**
 * 
 * @param source - the string the word is to be counted from
 * @param word - the word to be counted
 * 
 */
    public void countWord(String source, String word) {

        String str = source;
        Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\s"+word+"\\s");
        Matcher m = p.matcher(str);
        int count = 0;
        while (m.find()) {
            count++;
        }
        System.out.println("The word: " + "\"" + word + "\"" + " appears " + count + " times.");
        }

}

I have identified the source of the NPE here:

public int countWords(String source) {

    boolean word = false;
    int endOfLine = source.length() - 1;  //the source of the NPE is this line
    Integer counter = 0;

So looking at that, I figure I'm not initializing source correctly. I have tried things like WordCounter source = new WordCounter()

But every variant of this I try, bringing in the correct constructor, gives me other eclipse errors. I can't seem to get there, and I'm afraid I'm going down the wrong path. I probably have other screw ups in here as well. I'm also unsure of the correct way to run from the command line while passing in some strings as arguments to feed the methods. Thanks in advance

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I agree with the answers, but the next thing is to work out how to fix it. Conceptually, where should the source string be coming from? What is supposed to supply its value? –  Patricia Shanahan Nov 5 '12 at 23:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

your sourceString in your main method is null and you are passing it as an argument to countWords method.

 public static void main(String[] args) {
        String source = null;// it is null here
        ..............
        ............
        counter.countWords(source);// passing null here

thus in your countWords when you call

    int endOfLine = source.length() - 1;

as your source is null it will throw NullPointerException.

initialize your string to get rid of NPE.

EDIT: if you want to pass source as a command line argument.

String source =args[0];

and pass the commandline arguments at runtime.

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The question of a novice, but.... what do I initialize this to? I want to pass arguments at the command line to the main. I want "source" to be a string passed at the command line. How do I pass the argument and initialize source properly? –  City17Mogul Nov 5 '12 at 23:47
    
@City17Mogul check my edit –  PermGenError Nov 5 '12 at 23:49
    
Thanks, this helped a lot. For follow up for a remaining bug, my second arg is optional. This kind of initialization: String source = args[0]; String source2 = args[1]; Will return an error if I omit the second arg. How do I get around this? –  City17Mogul Nov 6 '12 at 0:47
    
in case of optinal check the length of the args array. like if(args.length>1){ String source2= args[2]; } –  PermGenError Nov 6 '12 at 0:52
    
Oops ok simple fix. I just initialized the required string as well as the optional on as both being = args[0], and then did an if to set the optional one as args[1] if there was more than one arg. String source = args[0]; String uniqueword = args[0]; if(args.length > 0) source = args[0]; if(args.length > 1){ uniqueword = args[1]; }else{ uniqueword = null; –  City17Mogul Nov 6 '12 at 2:51

Your main method:

public static void main(String[] args) {
        String source = null;
        // ... a few lines
        counter.countWords(source);
        // ... more code

}

The resulting error:

public int countWords(String source) {
    boolean word = false;
    int endOfLine = source.length() - 1;  //the source of the NPE is this line
    Integer counter = 0;
}

happens because source is null.

share|improve this answer

You pass null as source and call source.length a bit later. That causes the NPE.

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counter.countWords(source);

Here source String is null causing NPE.

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In your main method, you assign source to be null. You never reassign it to anything else so, when you call counter.countWords(source) it is the equivalent of calling counter.countWords(null).

This means, when you get to the line in countWords() where it attempts to call source.length(), source is actually null thus causing a NullPointerException to be thrown. To avoid this, you must assign source to be something prior to calling that method.

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Here's my version, based on your "manual line parsing" approach:

package forums;

import java.util.List;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Set;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;

public class WordCounterApp {

    private static void printUsage() {
        System.out.println("usage: java -cp C:\\Java\\home\\classes forums.WordCounterApp <text> [targetWord]");
        System.out.println("   <text> is a quoted string to be split into words.");
        System.out.println("   optional [targetWord] to be counted seperately.");
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     *  REQUIRED [0] text: a quoted string to be searched for words. 
     *  OPTIONAL [1] targetWord: the word to be counted, if desired.
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        if (args.length==0) {
            printUsage();
            return;
        }
        String text = args[0];
        String targetWord = args.length>1 ? args[1] : null;
        WordCount wordCount = new WordCount(text);

        System.out.println();

        // all words in this string
        List<String> words = wordCount.all();
        System.out.println("There are "+words.size()+" words in the string. That are:\n"+words);
        System.out.println();

        // unique words in this string
        Set<String> uniqueWords = wordCount.unique();
        System.out.println("There are "+uniqueWords.size()+" unique words in the string. They are:\n"+uniqueWords);
        System.out.println();

        // the number of occurrences of the target word in this string, if given
        if (targetWord ! = null) {
            int targetCount = wordCount.of(targetWord);
            System.out.println("The word \""+targetWord+"\" appears "+targetCount+" times.");
            System.out.println();
        }

    }
}

/**
 * Counts the words on a line, in various ways.
 */
class WordCount 
{
    private final String _line;
    public WordCount(String line) {
        _line = line;
    }

    public List<String> all() {
        final List<String> results = new ArrayList<String>(64); // just a guess at max word-count.
        final Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile("\\w+").matcher(_line);
        int count = 0;
        while ( matcher.find() )
            results.add(matcher.group());
        return results;
    }

    /**
     * Returns a set of the unique words in the line
     */
    public Set<String> unique() {
        final HashSet<String> results = new HashSet<String>();
        final int lineLength = _line.length();
        final int endOfLine = lineLength-1;
        final StringBuilder wordBuffer = new StringBuilder(16); // just a guess at max-word-length
        char ch;
        boolean isInWord = false;
        // foreach character in the line EXCEPT the last one:
        for ( int i=0; i<endOfLine; ++i ) {
            ch = _line.charAt(i);
            if ( Character.isLetter(ch) ) {
                // we're at the start or continuation of the current word.
                wordBuffer.append(ch);
                isInWord = true;
            } else if ( isInWord ) {
                // we're reached the end-of-word, or the end-of-the-line.
                results.add(wordBuffer.toString());
                wordBuffer.setLength(0); // clear the word-buffer.
                isInWord = false;
            }
        }
        // handle the last character in the line seperately, just to save
        // testing for it everytime through the loop... and I personally 
        // think that the logic is easier to follow this way.
        ch = _line.charAt(endOfLine);
        if ( Character.isLetter(ch) )
            wordBuffer.append(ch);
        if ( wordBuffer.length() > 0 )
            results.add(wordBuffer.toString());
        return results;
    }

    /**
     * Returns the number of occurences of the targetWord.
     * @param targetWord - the word to be counted.
     */
    public int of(String targetWord) {
        final String regex = "\\s+"+targetWord+"\\s+";
        final Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile(regex).matcher(_line);
        int count = 0;
        while ( matcher.find() )
            ++count;
        return count;
    }

}

If was doing this for myself the all method would just use String.split(String regex) (because it's more succinct); and then the unique method would start with the results of the all method, instead of "manually parsing" the words out of the line (again because it's much more succinct).

Also, if I was doing this for real I'd be inclined to have one frequencyTable method that returns a HashMap<String, int> containing "the frequency table" - i.e. a map of each distinct word to the number of times it occurs. This recipe is flexible (and therefore reusable) and tends to be more efficient because you typically parse a line once, and then repeatedly query the parse-results... and if you're only querying the result once then you really haven't lost anything except a few clockticks, and they come in billions these days.

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Just now discovering the .split method tonight..... wish I would have gone down that route to begin with. But hey, it's all about the learning. –  City17Mogul Nov 6 '12 at 2:25
    
Just now I thought it'd be "nice" if the string class had a words extension method that "wrapped" the call to split, because this (splitting a string into words) is a fairly common problem (and therefore something that's implemented far too often by too many programmers in too many programs)... but I was C#-dreaming in Javaland... Java doesn't have extension-methods (AFAIK, yet)... the java equivalent is still a "utility class", much like WordCount. –  corlettk Nov 6 '12 at 3:03

City17Mogul,

I stopped reading at your main method, because I already found a show-stopper: You're not doing anything at all with args (the command-line arguments passed into the main method)... so your source, uniqueWord, and word variables are ALLWAYS null... and I presume that is the root cause of your NullPointerException's.

You might also want to google for: How to read a stacktrace... it's a skill new programmers must learn, and the skill is even portable between (almost all) modern languages.

The stacktrace would have told you exactly which line of code the NPE occurs on, and from there it's usually pretty easy to workout which variable(s) is/are null... especially if you use a debugger... just put a breakpoint on the offending line, rerun the program WITH THE SAME INPUTS, and examine the value of all variables on that line... one or more of them must be null.

Cheers. Keith.

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Nothing says a program has to use the command-line arguments if it doesn't need them. –  Jim Garrison Nov 5 '12 at 23:39
    
@Jim Garrison: I quote: "I have compiled and tried to run from the command line, giving the application I'm running a couple strings when running at the command line." –  corlettk Nov 5 '12 at 23:51

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