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I'm trying to count the number of words from a text file, namely this, to start.

This is a test of the word count program. This is only a test. If your program works successfully, you should calculate that there are 30 words in this file.

I am using StreamReader to put everything from the file into a string, and then use the .Split method to get the number of individual words, but I keep getting the wrong value when I compile and run the program.

using System;
using System.IO;

class WordCounter
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string inFileName = null;

        Console.WriteLine("Enter the name of the file to process:");
        inFileName = Console.ReadLine();

        StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(inFileName);

        int counter = 0;
        string delim = " ,.";
        string[] fields = null;
        string line = null;

        while(!sr.EndOfStream)
        {
            line = sr.ReadLine();
        }



        fields = line.Split(delim.ToCharArray());
        for(int i = 0; i < fields.Length; i++)
        {
            counter++;
        }
        sr.Close();
        Console.WriteLine("The word count is {0}", counter);
    }
} 
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1  
Unlike forum sites, we don't use "Thanks", or "Any help appreciated", or signatures on Stack Overflow. See "Should 'Hi', 'thanks,' taglines, and salutations be removed from posts?. Also, I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Nov 5 '12 at 23:52

4 Answers 4

Try to use regular expression, e.g.:

var count = Regex.Matches(input, @"\b\w+\b").Count();
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A couple hints.

  1. What if you just have the sentence "hi" what would be your output?
  2. Your counter calculation is: from 0 through fields.Length, increment counter. How are fields.Length and your counter related?
share|improve this answer
    
1. When I just put "hi" in the text file, it tells me that the word count is 1. –  user1781027 Nov 5 '12 at 23:56

this should work for you:

using System;
using System.IO;

class WordCounter
{
static void Main()
{
      string inFileName = null;

      Console.WriteLine("Enter the name of the file to process:");
      inFileName = Console.ReadLine();

      StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(inFileName);

      int counter = 0;
      string delim = " ,."; //maybe some more delimiters like ?! and so on
      string[] fields = null;
      string line = null;

      while(!sr.EndOfStream)
      {
         line = sr.ReadLine();//each time you read a line you should split it into the words
         line.Trim();
         fields = line.Split(delim.ToCharArray(), StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
         counter+=fields.Length; //and just add how many of them there is
      }


      sr.Close();
      Console.WriteLine("The word count is {0}", counter);
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Why not StreamReader.ReadToEnd()? –  Niko Drašković Nov 5 '12 at 23:59
    
@NikoDrašković What if the file has 1000 or 10000 or 10M words? Since I've started with C long ago, I would never use a ReadToEnd, it's a habit but think that reading into memory something that is in a file in cases when I can read it in chunks isn't the best option. Also this illustrates OP's errors in code. –  Nikola Davidovic Nov 6 '12 at 0:00
    
Your code worked, but I don't understand why. When I only output fields.Length, it gives me a value of 3. How come, counter+=fields.Length gives 30, when counter was initialized as 0? –  user1781027 Nov 6 '12 at 0:12
    
What if the file is 10M and has a single line? :) Jokes aside, if the file really was big, I'd consider using Michael Abrashes approach. If it wasn't I'd use ReadToEnd(), though your point in reading files in chunks is valid! –  Niko Drašković Nov 6 '12 at 0:12
    
@NikoDrašković Good point for a single line :-). Never thought of that really. I must try it. And I was thinking on a good old fscanf() or fgets() kind of things. Not that advanced file reading. –  Nikola Davidovic Nov 6 '12 at 0:17

you're probably getting a one off error, try something like this

    counter = 0;
    while(!sr.EndOfStream)
    {
        line = sr.ReadLine();
        fields = line.Split(delim.ToCharArray());
        counter += field.length();
    }

there is no need to iterate over the array to count the elements when you can get the number directly

share|improve this answer
    
I the text file given to me, the paragraph was arranged into 3 lines, with the last line containing only "in this file." When I tried Console.WriteLine(line); in my program without anything else, it just outputted "in this file." Do you know why it just read the last line? –  user1781027 Nov 6 '12 at 0:02
    
ah,k srry I didn't look at it carefully enough, it's because read line reads only one line at a time so you are reading all thre but only counting the last one read –  Ben Glasser Nov 6 '12 at 0:06
    
I changed my code so that it is now line += sr.ReadLine + " "; and it now outputs the entire string when I display the string on Console.WriteLine. However, it gives me a value of 35 when I try to display fields.Length. Any idea why? –  user1781027 Nov 6 '12 at 0:21
    
how many words are in the file? 34? –  Ben Glasser Nov 6 '12 at 0:24
    
Technically 29 words, but we're supposed to count the number 30 as a word too, so 30 words in total. –  user1781027 Nov 6 '12 at 0:27

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