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I am trying to use existing Java classes to create a web service using Axis2.

When I send a request to the web service, Axis2 displays the following message:

[01 Nov 2012 16:37:05:244] classloader.BeanInfoCache: Unable to locate a BeanInfo cache for class ems.shared.Fti (stopClass=class java.lang.Object). This will negatively affect performance!

I'm not sure what that error means, but it makes me wonder if the ems.shared.Fti class doesn't satisfy all the requirements to being a Java Bean. Can you see anything wrong with this class?

package ems.shared;

import java.io.Serializable;

public class Fti implements Serializable
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 7476379431395094501L;

    public static final Fti UNDEFINED = new Fti(-1);

    public static final Fti BROADCAST = new Fti((int) (Math.pow(2, 20) - 2));

    private int fti;

    public Fti() {

    }

    public Fti(int fti)
    {
        this.fti = fti;
    }

    public Fti(String fti)
    {
        try
        {
            this.fti = Integer.parseInt(fti);
        }
        catch (NumberFormatException e)
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(fti + " is not a valid FTI");
        }
    }

    public void setFti(int fti) {
        this.fti = fti;
    }

    public int getFti() {
        return fti;
    }

    public int asInt()
    {
        return this.fti;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return String.valueOf(fti);
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode()
    {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + fti;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj)
    {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Fti other = (Fti) obj;
        if (fti != other.fti)
            return false;
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I believe explicit BeanInfo classes are an optimisation when using JavaBeans - they let you avoid analysing the bean class by reflection by providing the required info by hand. Providing them is not a common practice anymore, and the fact Axis2 doesn't cache this sort of information is mostly a consequence of it being an old and decrepit toolkit you might want to replace with something more modern. –  millimoose Nov 6 '12 at 1:46
    
I see. So that message has nothing to do with why the web service isn't working. Thanks for the information. –  pacoverflow Nov 6 '12 at 1:53
    
It's very unlikely. A previous employer used Axis2 everywhere, and I've never seen a BeanInfo class. We mostly generated stubs from WSDL, but I don't think those had beaninfos either. –  millimoose Nov 6 '12 at 1:57

2 Answers 2

BeanInfo is something separate. It was originally the mechanism by which a JavaBean would tell a Bean shell about itself, a la Visual Basic:

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23095_01/Platform.93/ATGProgGuide/html/s0503beaninfoexample01.html

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BeanInfo instances are created by the JavaBean introspector (see the JRE Javadoc). As pointed out by duffymo, it is possible to provide the BeanInfo explicitly together with the JavaBean, in which case the introspector simply loads that BeanInfo. This is primarily used for UI components and is not mandatory. For a JavaBean that has no explicit BeanInfo, the introspector simply constructs the BeanInfo instance using reflection. This is what happens in your case.

The point is that the JRE doesn't cache BeanInfo objects. The reason is that it cannot do that without the risk of causing class loader leaks (see IZ67457 for an example of a bug caused by an attempt to cache these objects in certain versions of the IBM JRE). However, constructing a BeanInfo object using reflection is a costly operation. Therefore Axis2 has its own BeanInfo cache. That cache is carefully designed to avoid class loader leaks.

The message that you get (which BTW is a warning, not an error) simply says that in your case Axis2 is not able to use a cached BeanInfo object. There are two possible reasons for that: either you are in a scenario where it is impossible to cache the BeanInfo object without potentially causing a class loader leak, or you are in a scenario where the BeanInfo object could be cached without causing a class loader leak but that is not supported by the BeanInfo cache (i.e. you are encountering a limitation in the cache implementation).

To analyze this further, you need to determine which class loader loads the Fti class, which class loader loads the BeanInfoCache class (i.e. the axis2-kernel JAR) and how these class loaders are related to each other (e.g. are they related by a parent-child relationship).

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