Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

given the async nature of mongoose (or sequelize, or redis) queries, what do you do when you have multiple queries you need to make before rendering the view?

For instance, you have a user_id in a session, and want to retrieve some info about that particular user via findOne. But you also want to display a list of recently logged in users.

exports.index = function (req, res) {
    var current_user = null

    Player.find({last_logged_in : today()}).exec(function(err, players) {
        if (err) return res.render('500');

        if (req.session.user_id) {
            Player.findOne({_id : req.session.user_id}).exec(function(err, player) {
                if (err) return;
                if (player) {
                    current_user = player
                }
            })
        }

        // here, current_user isn't populated until the callback fires 
        res.render('game/index', { title: 'Battle!',
                   players: players,
                   game_is_full: (players.length >= 6),
                   current_user: current_user
        });
    });
};

So res.render is in the first query callback, fine. But what about waiting on the response from findOne to see if we know this user? It is only called conditionally, so I can't put render inside the inner callback, unless I duplicate it for either condition. Not pretty.

I can think of some workarounds -

  • make it really async and use AJAX on the client side to get the current user's profile. But this seems like more work than it's worth.

  • use Q and promises to wait on the resolution of the findOne query before rendering. But in a way, this would be like forcing blocking to make the response wait on my operation. Doesn't seem right.

  • use a middleware function to get the current user info. This seems cleaner, makes the query reusable. However I'm not sure how to go about it or if it would still manifest the same problem.

Of course, in a more extreme case, if you have a dozen queries to make, things might get ugly. So, what is the usual pattern given this type of requirement?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yep, this is a particularly annoying case in async code. What you can do is to put the code you'd have to duplicate into a local function to keep it DRY:

exports.index = function (req, res) {
    var current_user = null

    Player.find({last_logged_in : today()}).exec(function(err, players) {
        if (err) return res.render('500');

        function render() {
            res.render('game/index', { title: 'Battle!',
                       players: players,
                       game_is_full: (players.length >= 6),
                       current_user: current_user
            });
        }

        if (req.session.user_id) {
            Player.findOne({_id : req.session.user_id}).exec(function(err, player) {
                if (err) return;
                if (player) {
                    current_user = player
                }
                render();
            })
        } else {
            render();
        }
    });
};

However, looking at what you're doing here, you'll probably need to look up the current player information in multiple request handlers, so in that case you're better off using middleware.

Something like:

exports.loadUser = function (req, res, next) {
    if (req.session.user_id) {
        Player.findOne({_id : req.session.user_id}).exec(function(err, player) {
            if (err) return;
            if (player) {
                req.player = player
            }
            next();
        })
    } else {
        next();
    }
}

Then you'd configure your routes to call loadUser wherever you need req.player populated and the route handler can just pull the player details right from there.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, seems simple enough. What about using async.parallel to pull all the results together? I tried it and it seems to work, but wonder if it's a good approach. Yours is a lot less obfuscated, for sure. –  sbeam Nov 6 '12 at 3:54
    
Yeah async.parallel doesn't work well here. I updated my answer to include a middleware solution that's probably a better fit for your use case. –  JohnnyHK Nov 6 '12 at 4:55
    
nice, that's reusable and cleaner thanks to chaining with next(). –  sbeam Nov 6 '12 at 13:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.