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I'm new to using initializer lists and I'm wondering if they work similar to other stl containers. By that I mean do they copy values? What I'm trying to do is a simple min() function like this:

template <class T> T& minArgs(const std::initializer_list<T&>& Arguments)
{
    const T* Smallest = Arguments.begin();
    for (const T* I = begin(Arguments); I != end(Arguments); ++I)
    {
        if (*I < *Smallest) Smallest = I;
    }
    return *Smallest;
}

However when I call the function I get this from GCC:

error: 'const' qualifiers cannot be applied to 'int&'

I've been playing around with this and it seems initializer_lists may not do what I want; I want the function to except non-POD arguments as well. Would a va_list be a better alternative?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
"However when I call the function" That's not a function; that's a template. How do you instantiate it? – Nicol Bolas Nov 6 '12 at 2:48
    
Sorry, I forgot to mention that. It's called with something like: int X = minArgs({10, 20}); I also tried int& X, but that gives the same error. – user990683 Nov 6 '12 at 2:49
    
std::initializer_list is all about values. It is also meant to be taken by value so that it as moved (as a std::initializer_list literal is by definition an rvalue reference). take it as a std::initializer_list<T> and see what happens. – Robert Mason Nov 6 '12 at 3:09

When I try it, I get these errors. Yet, when I get rid of your pointless use of references, it all works.

std::initializer_list stores values, not references. You should be taking a const std::initializer_list<T> &, not a const std::initializer_list<T&> &.

All I'm trying to do is write a function that takes any number of arguments, by reference, and returns a reference to the largest of them. [...] Is this possible with initializer_lists?

No. std::initializer_list is for values, not references. But I see no reason why you couldn't take the items by value instead of by reference. Or, more to the point, why don't you just use std::min, which can take an initializer list?

share|improve this answer
    
My "pointless use of references" was to all passing in non-POD arguments by reference. When I use a class in your version it gives an error: "passing 'const Class' as 'this' argument of 'bool Class::operator<(const Class&)' discards qualifiers [-fpermissive] In "Class" the < operator is overloaded as "bool operator<(const Class& Other)". – user990683 Nov 6 '12 at 3:15
1  
@user990683: It's kinda hard to diagnose a problem when you leave out the actual problem. Namely, this Class definition that you neglected to give us. At the very least, if you're going to claim that there's some error, then actually give us enough information to see the error for ourselves. Your use case, by your own admission, was integers. Now you're suddenly talking about some Class that you neglected to give us. Ask a full and complete question, and you might get a full and complete answer. – Nicol Bolas Nov 6 '12 at 3:21
    
@user990683: It seems, from your error, that you didn't declare operator< to be const. – Nicol Bolas Nov 6 '12 at 3:23
    
I did indeed forget to declare it const, thanks for pointing that out. Class is just a generic class to test the minArgs function. Let it be any class that has the < operator overloaded, it doesn't matter. All I'm trying to do is write a function that takes any number of arguments, by reference, and returns a reference to the largest of them. So I can input 4 "Class"'s, and the function will return the Class determined "largest" (determined by the overloaded < operator of course). Is this possible with initializer_lists? – user990683 Nov 6 '12 at 3:32
1  
"All I'm trying to do is write a function that takes any number of arguments, by reference, and returns a reference to the largest of them." If that was your question, you should have asked for that. – Nicol Bolas Nov 6 '12 at 3:37

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