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I'm trying to instantiate a class object whose desired name is held in a variable that's created elsewhere.

I can't figure out how to make the instance of the class have the name held by the variable.

example:

class foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.var1 = "bar"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    test = "a" # returned by another func.
    [string held by variable 'test'] = foo()
    print a.var1

Is this possible? (or even advisable...)

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is not advisable, since it makes it difficult to program with the variable a when you do not know its name until run-time.

You might think about using a dict instead:

data = {}
test = func()   # "a"
data[test] = foo()
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I was just running into that problem as I then thought about what I then wanted to do next with the class functions... hmmm. Time to re-think. Thank you. –  Jay Gattuso Nov 6 '12 at 3:03
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A function is probably better - that way the work you need to do is encapsulated and can be re-used:

def do_work(an_instance_of_foo):
    print an_instance_of_foo.var1

class foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.var1 = "bar"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    do_work(foo())

If you also need the word, you can pass it to the function:

def do_work(an_instance_of_foo, my_word):
    # etc.

Alternately, you can use a dictionary as a namespace (as @unutbu has suggested) if you need the instance of foo to be associated with a particular name.

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