Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In python, one can easily define an iterator function, by putting the yield keyword in the function's body, such as:

def gen():
    for i in range(100):
        yield i

How can I define a generator function that yields no value (generates 0 values), the following code doesn't work, since python cannot know that it is supposed to be an generator and not a normal function:

def empty():
    pass

I could do something like

def empty():
    if False:
        yield None

But that would be very ugly. Is there any nice way to realize an empty iterator function?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can use return once in a generator; it stops iteration without yielding anything, and thus provides an explicit alternative to letting the function run out of scope. So use yield to turn the function into a generator, but precede it with return to terminate the generator before yielding anything.

>>> def f():
...     return
...     yield
... 
>>> list(f())
[]

I'm not sure it's that much better than what you have -- it just replaces a no-op if statement with a no-op yield statement. But I suppose it is more idiomatic. Note that just using yield doesn't work.

>>> def f():
...     yield
... 
>>> list(f())
[None]
share|improve this answer
    
+1, This is the correct answer. –  John Nov 6 '12 at 3:27
    
This is indeed better than if False: yield but still kinda confusing for people who don't know this pattern –  Konstantin Weitz Nov 6 '12 at 3:27
add comment

Python 3.3 (because I'm on a yield from kick, and because @senderle stole my first thought):

>>> def f():
...     yield from ()
... 
>>> list(f())
[]

But I have to admit, I'm having a hard time coming up with a use case for this for which iter([]) or (x)range(0) wouldn't work equally well.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like this syntax. yield from is awesome! –  Konstantin Weitz Nov 6 '12 at 3:34
add comment

Must it be a generator function? If not, how about

def f():
    return iter([])
share|improve this answer
add comment

Will this work?

def f(): yield

Also there is a pretty good discussion here.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - beat me too it :-) –  Sean Vieira Nov 6 '12 at 3:13
3  
This does not work, as it returns None once –  Konstantin Weitz Nov 6 '12 at 3:19
add comment

And another option is:

(x for x in [])

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.