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I have created a table with an UTF-8 VARCHAR(5000), and filled it with data. But it looks like this field is allowing more data than it is instructed to:

mysql> DESCRIBE test;
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field   | Type             | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id      | int(10) unsigned | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| comment | varchar(5000)    | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> SELECT MAX(LENGTH(comment)) FROM test;
+----------------------+
| MAX(LENGTH(comment)) |
+----------------------+
|                 5001 |
+----------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

Why is that?

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no it not like that. I have tested. which MySQL version you are using? – diEcho Nov 6 '12 at 4:43
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ok, the problem is that LENGTH() returns the length in bytes, not chars. Because the string is UTF-8, I need to use CHAR_LENGTH() instead:

mysql> DESCRIBE test;
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field   | Type             | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id      | int(10) unsigned | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| comment | varchar(5000)    | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> SELECT MAX(LENGTH(comment)) FROM test;
+----------------------+
| MAX(LENGTH(comment)) |
+----------------------+
|                 5001 |
+----------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> SELECT MAX(CHAR_LENGTH(comment)) FROM test;
+----------------------+
| MAX(LENGTH(comment)) |
+----------------------+
|                 5000 |
+----------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

The length was 5001 because the string contained exactly one two-byte character!

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       The following table illustrates the differences between CHAR and VARCHAR
 by showing the result of storing various string values into CHAR(4) and
 VARCHAR(4) columns (assuming that the column uses a single-byte character
 set such as latin1).

    Value   |CHAR(4)    |Storage Required   |VARCHAR(4) |Storage Required
===================================================================================
    ''          '    '  4 bytes            ''           1 byte
    'ab'        'ab  '  4 bytes            'ab'         3 bytes
    'abcd'      'abcd'  4 bytes            'abcd'       5 bytes
    'abcdefgh'  'abcd'  4 bytes            'abcd'       5 bytes
===================================================================================


       The values shown as stored in the last row of the table apply only when
  not using strict mode; if MySQL is running in strict mode, values that exceed 
  the column length are not stored, and an error results.
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The effective maximum length of a VARCHAR is 65,535 bytes. The number 5,000 you had created the VARCHAR column with, does not actually limit the length of the allowable storage for VARCHAR column. This is a different behavior as compared with CHAR data type.

11.4.1. The CHAR and VARCHAR Types

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On MySQL 5.6 at least, it's not: I inserted another 6000 chars, and it was truncated to 5000. What's really weird, is that this time it was not 5001! – Benjamin Nov 6 '12 at 5:06
    
@Benjamin - Interesting, I'd need to test it. According to MySQL Reference Guide, the 65,535 bytes are shared among all the columns in the table and there is also an issue with the character coding. Would any of those two issues affect your problem? – GregD Nov 6 '12 at 5:12
    
Ok, I got it, because the column is UTF-8, I can store up to 5000 UTF-8 chars, not bytes. That's normal. The problem is, LENGTH() seems to return the length in bytes, hence > 5000 if not all ASCII. I'm wondering whether this is a bug in LENGTH(), or a documented behaviour! – Benjamin Nov 6 '12 at 5:18
    
Actually it is, LENGTH() returns the length in bytes, whereas CHAR_LENGTH() returns the length in chars! – Benjamin Nov 6 '12 at 5:20
    
@Benjamin, I did a little test on my 5.6 version and I've similar results: mysql> CREATE TABLE t (c VARCHAR(5000)); mysql> INSERT INTO t VALUES (REPEAT('a',6000)); ERROR 1406 (22001): Data too long for column 'c' at row 1 mysql> INSERT INTO t VALUES (REPEAT('a',5000)); Query OK, 1 row affected (0.10 sec) mysql> INSERT INTO t VALUES (REPEAT('a',5001)); ERROR 1406 (22001): Data too long for column 'c' at row 1 mysql> SET @@SQL_MODE = ""; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.04 sec) mysql> INSERT INTO t VALUES (REPEAT('a',5001)); Query OK, 1 row affected, 1 warning (0.08 sec) – GregD Nov 6 '12 at 5:42

would it be that 5000 starts at zero, then counts on giving you 5001 chars. Does it do 5002 ?

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