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New to python-can someone tell me what I am doing wrong?

I need to write a function that takes unknown number of arguments and returns a unique list. For example:

a= ['mary', 'james', 'john', 'john']
b= ['elsie', 'james', 'elsie', 'james']

unique_list(a,b)

['mary', 'james','john', 'elsie']

This is some of the code I have after doing some research but the output is not what I need:

def unique_list:(*something)
    result1= list(something)
    result = ' '.join(sum(result1, []))
    new= []
    for name in result:
            if name not in new:
                           new.append(name)
    return new
       
>>> unique_list(a,b)
['m', 'a', 'r', 'y', ' ', 'j', 'e', 's', 'o', 'h', 'n', 'l', 'i']

This is another one I have tired:

def unique_list(*something):
    result= list(something) 
    new=[]
    for name in result:
        if name not in new:
            new.append(name)
    return new
>>> unique_list(a,b)
[['mary', 'james', 'john', 'john'], ['elsie', 'james', 'elsie', 'james']]

Another one but I got an error message:

def single_list(*something):
    new=[]
    for name in something:
        if name not in new:
            new.append(name)
    new2= list(set(new))
    return new2
>>> single_list(a,b)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "", line 1, in 
    single_list(a,b)
  File "", line 6, in single_list
    new2= list(set(new))
TypeError: unhashable type: 'list'

Any ideas? Thank you in advance for all your help.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can concatenate all the lists and then create a set from this resulting list. This will work for any number of passed in lists where the function looks like def unique_lists( *lists )

ret_list = []
for l in lists:
    ret_list = ret_list + l

return set( ret_list )
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@sean- This is perfect thank you! –  JJoseph Nov 6 '12 at 6:28

You can use a set:

def unique_list(a, b):
    return list(set(a + b))

For an unknown number of arguments, you can add all the lists together with a reduce:

import operator
def unique_list(*args):
    return list(set(reduce(operator.add, args)))

This outputs:

>>> a= ['mary', 'james', 'john', 'john']
>>> b= ['elsie', 'james', 'elsie', 'james']
>>> unique_list(a, b)
['james', 'john', 'mary', 'elsie']
share|improve this answer
    
what if there are unknown number of arguments? –  JJoseph Nov 6 '12 at 6:20
    
Updated the answer. –  del Nov 6 '12 at 6:38
    
@del- thank you. really appreciate it. –  JJoseph Nov 6 '12 at 6:49

At your second try you almost got it right.

Actually at that part of code you considered each list as an element. You probably wanted to consider each element of the list. So your code could be:

def unique_list(*something):
    result= list(something) 
    new=[]
    for names in result:
        for name in names:
            if name not in new:
                new.append(name)
    return new

That would have as a result:

['mary', 'james', 'john', 'elsie']

The same works for your third try. Please note that, in that case, creating a set from your list and then a list from this set may not return the elements in the same order as the original lists.

Depending on what you want, you could also use itertools.chain(). The function would be:

import itertools

def unique_list(*something):
    return list(set(itertools.chain(*something)))

The result would be (remember that sets don't keep the original order):

['james', 'john', 'mary', 'elsie']
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@ThiagoRRamos- thanks for pointing that out about sets and for showing another possible solution –  JJoseph Nov 6 '12 at 6:55

You wanted unknown number of arguments:

In [73]: import itertools

In [74]: def func(*args):
    ...:     return set(itertools.chain(*args))

In [75]: func([1,2,3,4],[3,4,5],[1,2])
Out[75]: set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])

or without itertools:

In [77]: def func2(*args):
    ...:     setlist=[set(i) for i in args]
    ...:     return set.union(*setlist)

In [78]: func2([1,2,3,4],[3,4,5],[1,2])
Out[78]: set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
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this works thank you! –  JJoseph Nov 6 '12 at 6:29
    
@ user1667805 -- you are welcome. added another option without itertools. –  root Nov 6 '12 at 6:38
a= ['mary', 'james', 'john', 'john']
b= ['elsie', 'james', 'elsie', 'james']
def unique_list(a, b):
    a.extend(b)
    return list(set(a))
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1  
This doesn't solve the problem - list elements are repeated in the resulting list. –  Tim Nov 6 '12 at 9:03

The function you are looking for (I think) is to make a set of the combination of two lists, and then make it into a list again. Like so:

list(set(list(a+b)))

gives: ['james', 'john', 'mary', 'elsie']

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