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Say I have an array like this:

[["bham", "php"],
 ["auburn", "php"],
 ["bham", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["mobile", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["tucson", "php"],
 ["tucson", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"],
 ["phoenix", "php"]]

I would like to do a few things:

  1. Count the number of arrays that have php as the 2nd element - so `["bham", "php"] would count as 1.
  2. Count the number of times each of the first elements appear throughout the list. i.e. how many times does bham appear in the entire array, and how many times does auburn appear, etc. So basically, I want to cycle through this 2D array and for the first element of each child, I want to check to see if I have already recorded this string - if I have then I increment the value recorded and if I have not then I create a new entry for this new string.

This particular array is relatively trivial and can be done visually relatively easily, but assume that I will have an array with hundreds/thousands of elements.

It is also safe to assume that both elements of each child array will always be a single word - so it should be relatively easy to keep track of.

How do I approach this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Count is easy:

a.count{|x| x[1] == 'php'}
#=> 24

And for grouping how about group_by:

a.group_by{|x| x[0]}.map{|k,v| [k,v.size]}
#=> [["bham", 2], ["auburn", 1], ["phoenix", 18], ["mobile", 1], ["tucson", 2]]
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Ah I thought that size took a block and was going to use that in my answer but then realized it didn't, but I guess only count does and that's what I was thinking of. +1 –  Andrew Marshall Nov 6 '12 at 6:42
    
I love this...I have one question though. Can you explain the group_by. As in, why do you group them first (I get that you grouped them by the first element) - if you didn't group them would the map function still work? Then can you explain what the map does. More specifically, how does v.size know to increment? I know that the v local variable maps to the 2nd element in the array from the block. I am just curious about the v.size with respect to doing exactly what I want it to do. –  marcamillion Nov 6 '12 at 6:52
    
Try it for yourself in irb: a.group_by{|x| x[0]} - it returns a hash with the grouped_by values as the keys and arrays of matches as the values. v.size is just Array#size applied to the matches arrays. –  pguardiario Nov 6 '12 at 6:58
    
I did do it in irb first, and saw the output, and I read the definition in the Ruby docs - but I missed the hashrocket that indicate the hash. I thought I was just seeing an array of arrays like the input. That's why I was a bit confused with how the map method was producing that result. But now that I see the right output, it makes total sense. Ok..Thanks much meng! –  marcamillion Nov 6 '12 at 7:03

Count the number of arrays that have php as the 2nd element

map to get just the last elements, then select only the ones we care about, and get the size:

array.map(&:last).select { |s| s == 'php' }.size
#=> 24

Count the number of times each of the first elements appear throughout the list

map to get just the first elements, then iterate over it building a hash to store the counts:

array.map(&:first).each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) { |s, h| h[s] += 1 }
#=> {"bham"=>2, "auburn"=>1, "phoenix"=>18, "mobile"=>1, "tucson"=>2}
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Thanks for this...I prefer pguardiario's solution though - appears more elegant. But I upvoted yours for detail and effort. I really appreciate you taking the time :) –  marcamillion Nov 6 '12 at 7:04

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