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In Scala (2.9.2) I am trying to create a function that provides some other value when accessed

() => Any

I thought I was successfully doing this via a by name / currying solution:

def byName(theValue : => Any)() : Any = theValue
val myHolder = byName(myValue)_

So my holder is of the correct type. However I find that in the course of creating this curried function the by name parameter is evaluated. If I do the following instead it works as intended:

def byName(theValue : => Any) : Any = () => theValue
val myHolder = byName(myValue)

I conclude some part of the currying process is referencing the first parameter list and triggering its evaluation. Can anybody confirm that and/or explain why or if there are any guidelines around using by name parameters with multiple parameter lists?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This seems like a bug to me. I could trigger this strange behaviour in scala 2.9.1, but not in scala 2.10 RC1 so I guess this was fixed at some point.

In scala 2.9.1:

Welcome to Scala version 2.9.1.final (Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM, Java 1.6.0_27).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.
scala> def byName(theValue : => Any)() : Any = theValue
byName: (theValue: => Any)()Any
scala> def myValue: String = { println("Computing myValue"); "hello" }
myValue: String
scala> val myHolder = byName(myValue)_
Computing myValue
myHolder: () => Any = <function0>
scala> myHolder()
res0: Any = hello

In scala 2.10-RC1:

Welcome to Scala version 2.10.0-RC1 (Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM, Java 1.6.0_27).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> def byName(theValue : => Any)() : Any = theValue
byName: (theValue: => Any)()Any
scala> def myValue: String = { println("Computing myValue"); "hello" }
myValue: String
scala> val myHolder = byName(myValue)_
myHolder: () => Any = <function0>
scala> myHolder()
Computing myValue
res0: Any = hello
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I believe the bug is: issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-302 –  Steve Nov 6 '12 at 9:18
    
Well spotted. From the comments it seems that it was fixed in scala 2.10-M4. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Nov 6 '12 at 9:23
    
Perfect - thanks for the clarification. –  Luke Studley Nov 6 '12 at 15:56

The issues are https://issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-302 and https://issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-5610

Personally, I find what is now the "old" behavior more intuitive: Partial application means something is applied.

Or as Odersky had it:

No, that's how eta expansion is defined. You don't just wrap a lambda around the expression, you evaluate what you can first.

But conversely, it's easier to force evaluation than to devise a syntax for suspending it.

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Yes, but what does "apply" mean in the context of a by name parameter? What if you were to pass a Function0 as a parameter, would "apply" mean that the function has to be eagerly evaluated? The natural answer is no, and I would think that it is sensible to have the same conclusion for a by name parameter. In short, I personnally tend to agree with the counter arguments of Matt Hellige: issues.scala-lang.org/browse/… –  Régis Jean-Gilles Nov 6 '12 at 11:07
    
The spec on by-name calls it a "use." To me, f(myValue) looks like a use of myValue, whatever the result of the expr. If f is overloaded as f(v:V) and f(v:=>V), you can't tell by looking that a by-name myValue is evaluated and passed to the first f. (But I'm not virulently opposed to the change in semantics; but to me, the old spec was not as crazy and counter-intuitive as other puzzlers.) –  som-snytt Nov 6 '12 at 15:33
    
Hmm - both sides make some sense. Thanks for your comments. –  Luke Studley Nov 6 '12 at 15:56

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