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I have the following code which I want to make it so that board now has the value of new_board and vice versa. Since they are both pointers I thought I could just swap the addresses they point to. When I print in print2() the addresses are appropriately swapped. However, when I print in print1() the addresses have somehow swapped back, which doesn't make any sense to me. Further if I print out the values in the board at print2() they are also correct.

main(){
  char *new_board = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * rows * cols );
  char *board = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * rows * cols );
  update_board2(board, new_board, rows, cols);
  print1();
}

void update_board2(char *board, char *new_board, int rows, int cols){
  //do a bunch of stuff
  char *temp = board;
  board = new_board;
  new_board = temp;
  print2();
}
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4  
Pointers (like all other objects) are passed by value in C. update_board2 is operating of copies of the arguments passed. Also new_board and board are not declared as pointers. What compile errors and warnings are you getting? –  Charles Bailey Nov 6 '12 at 7:53
    
Sorry in my code they are, I miscopied. –  emschorsch Nov 6 '12 at 8:00
1  
Also, don't cast the return value of malloc() in C, and avoid sizeof (char) since it's just a very verbose 1. –  unwind Nov 6 '12 at 8:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you want to change the values of the pointers themselves, then the function update_board2 has to accept double pointers. Otherwise the pointers get copied within the function and you are swapping only these temporary copies rather than the real pointers the caller has passed:

void update_board2(char **board, char **new_board){
  char *temp = *board;
  *board = *new_board;
  *new_board = temp;
  print2();
}
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who knew. That was pretty confusing glad I learned a new source of confounding bugs today. I guess the fact that the values switched as soon as the function returned should have been a give away that it was copied by value not reference. –  emschorsch Nov 6 '12 at 8:10

You need to make the following change:

update_board2(&board, &new_board, rows, cols);

void update_board2(char **board, char **new_board, int rows, int cols){
  //do a bunch of stuff
  char *temp = *board;
  *board = *new_board;
  *new_board = temp;
  print2();
}

In this case pointers will be swapped correctly.

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And you can remove rows and cols parameters, as they are not used in the function. –  Patryk Nov 6 '12 at 7:59
1  
@Patryk They are supposed to be used in //do a bunch of stuff as I understand. –  Alex Nov 6 '12 at 8:00

your main needs to be fixed too

i.e.

char * new_board = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * rows * cols );
char * board = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * rows * cols );

malloc returns a pointer, not a character.

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