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I am currently converting decimal to binary, making sure it is 8 bits. All bit operations work except the ~ (NOT) operations. They come out as a huge integer value. I am not sure why, since the other bit operations work. Here is my code: (The commented out lines are what is not working)

Edit: If I want to get 8 bit binary strings, what do I do? Use unsigned chars? If I change all unsigned ints to unsigned chars then my BinaryToDecimal function produces incorrect binary conversion.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

string BinaryToDecimal(unsigned int dec)
{
    string binary   = "";
    float remainder = 0.0f;

    while( dec != 0 )
    {
        remainder = dec % 2;
        dec      /= 2;

        if( remainder == 0 )
            binary.append("0");
        else
            binary.append("1");
    }


    // Reverse binary string
    string ret = string(binary.rbegin(), binary.rend());

    return ret;
}

int main()
{
    unsigned int a = 0;
    unsigned int b = 0;

    cout << "Enter a number to convert to binary: ";
    cin  >> a;
    cout << "Enter a number to convert to binary: ";
    cin  >> b;

    cout << "A = " << BinaryToDecimal(a) << endl;
    cout << "B = " << BinaryToDecimal(b) << endl;

    unsigned int c = a & b;
    unsigned int d = a | b;
    //unsigned int e = ~a;
    //unsigned int f = ~b;
    unsigned int g = a ^ b;
    unsigned int h = a << 2;
    unsigned int i = b >> 3;

    cout << "A & B  = " << BinaryToDecimal(c) << endl;
    cout << "A | B  = " << BinaryToDecimal(d) << endl;
    //cout << "~A     = " << BinaryToDecimal(e) << endl;
    //cout << "~B     = " << BinaryToDecimal(f) << endl;
    cout << "A ^ B  = " << BinaryToDecimal(g) << endl;
    cout << "A << 2 = " << BinaryToDecimal(h) << endl;
    cout << "B >> 3 = " << BinaryToDecimal(i) << endl;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are using an unsigned int for the operations, such that the inversion of small number becomes a large number because of leading 1 starting from the MSB. If you only want the representation is 8 bit only, you should use unsigned char for its storage.
But you cannot change a or b to unsigned char. Otherwise, cin >> a will put the number's ASCII code to a, not a number. For example, your input is 5, it puts 0x35 ('5'), not number 5.

If you don't want to change unsigned int of your code, you can do some minor enhancements

string BinaryToDecimal(unsigned int dec)
{
    string binary   = "";
    float remainder = 0.0f;

    dec &= 0xff;        // only 8 bits you care about
    while( dec != 0 )
    {
        ....

But you are using while( dec !=0 ), which is buggy. If the result is already 0, then the function returns an empty string, not "0000". Instead, you should use a counter to count only for 8 bit.

    for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++ ) {
        if ((dec & 1) != 0)
            binary.append("1");
        else
            binary.append("0");
        dec >>= 1;
    }

Also, using bit wise AND to test the bit is 0 or 1, and shift operation, is better than / and % operators.

Finally, for 8 bit 5 (0000_0101), its inversion is 250 (1111_1010), not 1010.

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Can you explain how the enhanced code works? For example what does dec&= 0xff; do? Also the dec & 1 != 0, and dec >>= 1. And if I wanted to use unsigned char, unsigned char c = A & B, what would I have to do in order to get that working? –  Cypras Nov 6 '12 at 9:16
    
dec &= 0xff will only keep low 8 bits. Other leading 1s will be eliminated, such that your while(dec != 0) won't produce a long sequence of string. dec & 1 check the LSB is 0 or 1 by doing bitwise AND operation; dec >>= 1 will do right shifting, for example, 0101 becomes 0010. –  jclin Nov 6 '12 at 10:00
    
Can you give an example of dec & 1? Like it's comparing say 5 & 1, is that comparing 0101 & 1 or what? I don't understand, that's all. –  Cypras Nov 6 '12 at 23:24

If you perform a binary NOT on a small unsigned integer, you will get a large number as a result, seeing as most of the most significant bits will be set to 1 (the inverse of what they were in the operand).

In this case you're doing ~ 0 which will certainly give you a large number, in fact the largest possible unsigned int, since all bits will be set to 1.

(What result were you expecting?)

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No, because I am inputting a number, it won't be zero. I'm expecting if I input 5 (0101) it will come out as (1010). –  Cypras Nov 6 '12 at 8:25
1  
Stil the correct answer. 5 is stored as an unsigned int, which means it's at least 0000000000000101 –  MSalters Nov 6 '12 at 8:26
    
Well if I was trying for 8bits only, what do I need to change? –  Cypras Nov 6 '12 at 8:29
2  
Most reliable way would be to mask the result, ie AND it with 0xFF. –  davmac Nov 6 '12 at 8:30
    
@Cypras: you said it twice, but your code nowhere specifies that it "works with 8 bits only". –  ybungalobill Nov 6 '12 at 8:39

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