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Can anyone help me, why I'm getting an error message while trying to free the allocated memory: Heap corruption detected. CTR detected the application wrote the memory after end of heap buffer.

char *ff (char *s){
    char *s1 = new char [strlen(s)];
    strcpy(s1, s);
    return s1;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    char *s = new char [5];

    strcpy(s, "hello");
    char *s2 = ff(s);

    delete []s;     // This works normal
    delete []s2;    // But I get an error on that line
    return 0;
}
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9  
Obviously, this is just an exercise and in a real setting you would be using std::string instead, right ? –  Matthieu M. Nov 6 '12 at 8:51
    
@MatthieuM. Absolutely right. I'm not allowed to use std::string; –  user1448906 Nov 6 '12 at 14:49

8 Answers 8

up vote 34 down vote accepted
char *s = new char [5];
strcpy(s, "hello");

Causes Undefined behavior(UB).
You are writing beyond the bounds of allocated memery. You allocated enough memory for 5 characters but your string has 6 characters including the \0.

Once your program has caused this UB, all bets are off and any behavior is possible.

You need:

char *s = new char [strlen("hello") + 1];

In fact the ideal solution is to use std::string and not char *. These are precisley the mistakes which std::string avoids. And there is no real need of using char * instead of std::string in your example.
With std::string:

  • You don't need to new anything
  • You don't need to delete anything &
  • You can do everything with std::string, that you do with char *.
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1  
Agreed that using std::string is the best approach. One other way of writing the improved new allocation midway through your answer would be char *s = new char[sizeof("hello")], avoiding the call to strlen() at runtime (although a smart compiler could possibly optimize it out). That obviously only works if you have a constant string, though, which probably isn't the common case. –  Jason R Nov 6 '12 at 12:49

new char [strlen(s)]; does not count the closing \0 character, so your buffer is too short by one character.

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strcpy includes the null terminator; strlen does not. Write:

char *s1 = new char [strlen(s) + 1];
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Your initial string s is only five characters long so can't be null terminated. "hello" will be copied by strcpy including the null-terminator but you'll have overrun the buffer. The strlen needs it to be null terminated so if the null's not there, you'll have problems. Try changing this line:

char *s = new char [6];

Better still, prefer std::string to C style string functions - they're just as efficient and a lot safer and easier to use. Also, try to avoid new and delete unless you really have to use them. The problems you're getting are very common and can easily be avoided.

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You need to specify char *s1 = new char [strlen(s) + 1]; to make room for the '\0' which terminates the string.

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From man strcpy(3):

The strcpy() function copies the string pointed to by src, including the terminating null byte ('\0'), to the buffer pointed to by dest.

So you need to reserve 6 bytes 5 for the string and 1 for the NULL byte

char *s = new char [6];
strcpy(s, "hello");
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You've corrupted s2 pointer by

strcpy(s, "hello");

Because s has size 5, while you've missed that strcpy includes string terminator.

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All answers so far have addressed either the first or the second allocation. To sum up, there are two changes you must make:

char *s1 = new char [strlen(s) + 1];
...
char *s = new char [5 + 1];

In both cases, you must allocate enough space for the string plus one byte for the terminating '\0'.

As others already pointed out, with c++ it's easier and safer to use std::string. No fuss with allocation and release of memory or paying attention to '\0' bytes:

std::string ff (const std::string &s){
    std::string s1(s);
    // do something else with s1
    return s1;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::string s("hello");
    std::string s2 = ff(s);
    return 0;
}

and if it's just copying the string:

std::string s("hello");
std::string s2(s);
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