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Possible Duplicate:
How do I iterate over a range of numbers in bash?

I am trying to print "Hello World!" 10 times via the code below, but it is printed only one time. Where am I missing the correct syntax?

RUNS=10

for RUN in {1..$RUNS}
do
    echo "Hello World!"
done
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marked as duplicate by Rody Oldenhuis, eugene y, Lev Levitsky, Björn Pollex, LB40 Nov 6 '12 at 13:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want to do a brace expansion, but bash does not do double-expansion (it needs to expand $RUNS). You can force double-expansion by

for RUN in $(eval echo {1..$RUNS})
do 
    echo "Hello World!"
done

But I suggest you avoid this mess like the plague and just do

for RUN in $(seq 1 $RUNS) 
do 
    echo "Hello World!"
done

or

for ((RUN=1; RUN<RUNS; RUN++))
do 
    echo "Hello World!"
done
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This question contains all the answers you need

In brief, I would suggest you to use:

RUNS=10
for RUN in $(seq 1 $RUNS)
do
    echo "Hello World!"
done

since it will more likely work on other shells too.

If you want to avoid the overhead of the subshell, you can use:

RUNS=10
i=0;
while [ $i -lt $RUNS ]
do
    echo "Hello World!"
    i=$(($i+1))
done
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this fragment spawns child process seq, quite an overhead for a simple for-loop –  bobah Nov 6 '12 at 8:38
    
That's the way to do it for maximum compatibility with POSIX shell. Have a look here and here for other forms of bashisms. –  mrucci Nov 6 '12 at 8:46
    
this question is about Bash, neither about POSIX shell, nor about compatibility with POSIX shell –  bobah Nov 6 '12 at 8:50
1  
Absolutely. Also the question is not a about performance... –  mrucci Nov 6 '12 at 9:00
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{A..B} syntax does not seem to be substituting variables

for ((i=0; i < $RUNS; ++i)); do echo "hello world"; done
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1  
More specifically, brace expansion occurs before parameter expansion. As brace expansion requires constants, the whole construct is treated as a single string rather than being expanded. –  chepner Nov 6 '12 at 13:15
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