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I'm to stupid right now to solve this problem...

I get a BCD number (every digit is an own 4Bit representation)

For example, what I want:

  • Input: 202 (hex) == 514 (dec)
  • Output: BCD 0x415

  • Input: 0x202

  • Bit-representation: 0010 0000 0010 = 514

What have I tried:

unsigned int uiValue = 0x202;
unsigned int uiResult = 0;
unsigned int uiMultiplier = 1;
unsigned int uiDigit = 0;


// get the dec bcd value
while ( uiValue > 0 )
{
    uiDigit= uiValue & 0x0F;
    uiValue >>= 4;
    uiResult += uiMultiplier * uiDigit;
    uiMultiplier *= 10;
}

But I know that's very wrong this would be 202 in Bit representation and then split into 5 nibbles and then represented as decimal number again

I can solve the problem on paper but I just cant get it in a simple C-Code

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1  
Can I suggest that, when dealing with bytes and nibbles, hex masks are easier to put into context? eg 0x0F is more obvious that 15 (at least to me!) –  Andrew Nov 6 '12 at 9:10
    
I have added some more informations –  Sagi Nov 6 '12 at 9:10
    
@Andrew thats so true, will change this. thx –  Sagi Nov 6 '12 at 9:11
1  
@Andrew: But he said uiValue = 202, not 0x202.... And if it was 0x202, then the BCD value would be decimal 202... –  Daniel Gehriger Nov 6 '12 at 9:13
1  
@Sagi: Hence my answer below... –  Daniel Gehriger Nov 6 '12 at 9:19
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You got it the wrong way round. Your code is converting from BCD to binary, just as your question's (original) title says. But the input and output values you provided are correct only if you convert from binary to BCD. In that case, try:

while (uiValue > 0) {
   uiResult <<= 4;
   uiResult |= uiValue % 10;
   uiValue /= 10;
}

Proof: http://ideone.com/R0reQh

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, thats what I needed :) it's nearly the same code as I had, but I went the wrong direction... Thanks –  Sagi Nov 6 '12 at 9:43
    
This solution is flawed, try 2^10=%10000000000=0x400. The trailing zero's in the binary representation is not accounted for. –  PapaAtHome Oct 22 '13 at 8:05
    
Sorry, my previous comment is in error but I can't remove it. –  PapaAtHome Oct 22 '13 at 8:13
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The real problem here is confusion of bases and units

The 202 should be HEX which equates to 514 decimal... and therefore the BCD calcs are correct

Binary code decimal will convert the decimal (514) into three nibble sized fields: - 5 = 0101 - 1 = 0001 - 4 = 0100

The bigger problem was that you have the title the wrong way around, and you are converting Uint to BCD, whereas the title asked for BCD to Unint

share|improve this answer
    
Andrew, it's not as complicated as that. No need to convert from hex to decimal to find the BCD value. –  Daniel Gehriger Nov 6 '12 at 9:20
    
NO, but I think it explains the confusion... 0x202 == 514(bcd) whereas 202(dec) == 202(bcd) –  Andrew Nov 6 '12 at 9:23
    
@Andrew It's the other way, 0x202 == 202 (bcd). –  nos Nov 6 '12 at 9:33
    
Eh? Lets go simpler... 10d = 0Ah = (0001 0000)BCD == "10"bcd not "0A"bcd... so how can 0x202 == 202 BCD? –  Andrew Nov 6 '12 at 9:37
    
@Andrew 10d = 0Ah has a binary representation of 0000 1010 , so I guess it depends on whether his 202 means bcd, decimal or hex. Certainly uiValue = 202 is wrong, though the text says that it should be hex: Input: 202 (hex) If the input is 0x202 as the text says, the binary representaion of the input is 0000 0010 0000 0010, which we can convert easily to bcd. –  nos Nov 6 '12 at 9:39
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Try the following.

unsigned long toPackedBcd (unsigned int val)
{
  unsigned long bcdresult = 0; char i;


  for (i = 0; val; i++)
  {
    ((char*)&bcdresult)[i / 2] |= i & 1 ? (val % 10) << 4 : (val % 10) & 0xf;
    val /= 10;
  }
  return bcdresult;
}
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I test this function and it appears to work initially, but I haven't tried it for very large numbers or compared its efficiency with outher candidate algorithm to do the conversion from e.g. 11 to 17 or likewise. (My project is C code for the 7-segment LEDs of the Altera DE2 FPGA.) –  909 Niklas Mar 30 at 11:01
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A naive but simple solution:

char buffer[16];
sprintf(buffer, "%d", var);
sscanf(buffer, "%x", &var);
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this going to produce hex, where as the OP asked for BCD? They are not equivalent. I didn't down vote though. It's some body else –  fayyazkl Nov 6 '12 at 9:19
    
From the first revision of his question it was plain that he wanted to convert 202 to 514, It does just that. –  panda-34 Nov 6 '12 at 9:20
    
But he wants 514 BCD not 514 Hex –  Andrew Nov 6 '12 at 9:26
    
@Andrew, he started wanting that after my answer, I answered the first revision, where he stated that only input was in BCD –  panda-34 Nov 6 '12 at 9:29
2  
@nos, I don't know, should I answer the question in the title, in the question body or in the sample code. They're three different ones. –  panda-34 Nov 6 '12 at 9:45
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