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tldnr: given a function, is there a way to automatically create an ArgumentParser from its signature?

I've got a bunch of functions that I'd like to expose to the command line. So basically, a module:

 def copy(foo, bar, baz):
    ...
 def move(from, to):
    ...
 def unlink(parrot, nomore=True):
    ...

 if __name__ == '__main__':
     argparse stuff

which can be called from the command line like this:

 python commands.py move spam ham
 python commands.py unlink --parrot Polly

Although this is pretty straightforward to implement, there's a lot of wiring involved:

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(...)
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers()
...
c = subparsers.add_parser('unlink', description='Unlink a parrot')
c.add_argument('--parrot', help='parrots name', required=True)
c.add_argument('--nomore', help='this parrot is no more', action='store_true')
...
c = subparsers.add_parser('move', description='Move stuff')
...

and so on, for each function. The worst thing, should function arguments change (and they do), the argparse stuff needs to be synchronized manually.

It would be much nicer if the functions could provide argparse stuff for themselves, so that the main code would be like:

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(...)
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers()

copy.register(subparsers)
move.register(subparsers)
unlink.register(subparsers)
...

I thought of something along these lines:

@args(
    description='Unlink a parrot',
    parrot={'required':True, 'help':'parrots name'},
    nomore={'action': 'store_true', 'help': 'this parrot is no more'}
)
def unlink(parrot, nomore=True):
    ...

My questions:

  • is there a library that does something like this?
  • if no, is it possible to write such a decorator, and how?
  • is there a other/better way to implement what I want?

Upd:

plac appears to be the solution. Here's how to do what I want with plac:

commands module: cmds.py:

import plac

@plac.annotations(
    foo=('the foo thing'),
    bar=('the bar thing'),
    fast=('do a fast copy', 'flag')
)
def copy(foo, bar, fast=False):
    """Copy some foo to bar."""
    pass

@plac.annotations(
    parrots=('parrots names'),
    nomore=('these parrots are no more', 'flag'),
    repeat=('repeat n times', 'option', 'r', int)
)
def unlink(nomore=False, repeat=1, *parrots):
    """Unlink some parrots."""
    pass

#more commands...

# export commands so that plac knows about them
commands = 'copy', 'unlink'

and here's the main module:

import plac
import cmds

plac.call(cmds)

Quite neat if you ask me.

share|improve this question
    
Probably you'll have to add annotations to your functions. Then it should be possible to write a function that given a function annotation returns a parser for the function. –  Bakuriu Nov 6 '12 at 10:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you tried plac?

An example in docs:

# dbcli.py
import plac
from sqlalchemy.ext.sqlsoup import SqlSoup

@plac.annotations(
    db=plac.Annotation("Connection string", type=SqlSoup),
    header=plac.Annotation("Header", 'flag', 'H'),
    sqlcmd=plac.Annotation("SQL command", 'option', 'c', str, metavar="SQL"),
    delimiter=plac.Annotation("Column separator", 'option', 'd'),
    scripts=plac.Annotation("SQL scripts"),
    )
def main(db, header, sqlcmd, delimiter="|", *scripts):
    "A script to run queries and SQL scripts on a database"
    yield 'Working on %s' % db.bind.url

    if sqlcmd:
        result = db.bind.execute(sqlcmd)
        if header: # print the header
            yield delimiter.join(result.keys())
        for row in result: # print the rows
            yield delimiter.join(map(str, row))

    for script in scripts:
        db.bind.execute(open(script).read())
        yield 'executed %s' % script

if __name__ == '__main__':
    for output in plac.call(main):
        print(output)

Output:

usage: dbcli.py [-h] [-H] [-c SQL] [-d |] db [scripts [scripts ...]]

A script to run queries and SQL scripts on a database

positional arguments:
  db                    Connection string
  scripts               SQL scripts

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -H, --header          Header
  -c SQL, --sqlcmd SQL  SQL command
  -d |, --delimiter |   Column separator
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, plac appears to be the way to go. Many thanks! –  georg Nov 9 '12 at 16:55

Functionality akin to plac is provided by argh, which particularly features simple creation of subparsers (like those found in git or django-admin.py).

An example from its docs:

from argh import *

def dump(args):
    return db.find()

@command
def load(path, format='json'):
    print loaders[format].load(path)

p = ArghParser()
p.add_commands([load, dump])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    p.dispatch()

Produces the following --help response:

usage: prog.py [-h] {load,dump} ...

positional arguments:
  {load,dump}
    load
    dump

optional arguments:
  -h, --help   show this help message and exit

and the following with load --help:

usage: prog.py load [-h] [-f FORMAT] path

positional arguments:
  path

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -f FORMAT, --format FORMAT

Arguments may be annotated:

@arg('path')
@arg('--format', choices=['yaml','json'], default='json')
@arg('--dry-run', default=False)
@arg('-v', '--verbosity', choices=range(0,3), default=1)
def load(args, LOADERS={'json': json.load, 'yaml': yaml.load}):
    loader = loaders[args.format]
    data = loader(open(args.path))
    ...

And with @plain_signature, the args argument to load is expanded into keyword arguments:

@arg('path')
@arg('--format', choices=['yaml','json'], default='json')
@arg('--dry-run', default=False)
@arg('-v', '--verbosity', choices=range(0,3), default=1)
@plain_signature
def load(path, format, dry_run, verbosity):
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that looks interesting. There's also a list of similar projects in plac docs. –  georg Nov 11 '12 at 10:54
2  
It seems argh also has such a list apparently... and it's longer :P –  joeln Nov 11 '12 at 11:37
    
Argh now also supports the "natural" syntax, i.e. you write plain Python functions and the rest is Argh's business. –  Andy Mikhaylenko Oct 29 '13 at 7:23

You can use the inspect module to look at your own function definitions. This way you can at least write a rudimentary argparse skeleton. However, you will probably need more information than just the argument names and possibly default values.

For instance, you will also need to give a description. This info you can largely provide by creating a docstring in an appropriate format. There are parsers for docstrings (e.g. Sphynx) Using this extra information, I think you will be able to automatically generate argparse invocations for your functions.

I do not think a decorator is required, as probably all the information can be stored in your docstring.

Let me know how you fare, I am interested in the results of your project.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Parsing docstrings sounds tempting, but I guess I'll stick with plac for the time being (see the update). –  georg Nov 9 '12 at 16:57

Another insteresting alternative is commando python module as declarative interface to argparse with additional utilities.

Example

Without commando:

def main():
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='hyde - a python static website generator',
                                  epilog='Use %(prog)s {command} -h to get help on individual commands')
    parser.add_argument('-v', '--version', action='version', version='%(prog)s ' + __version__)
    parser.add_argument('-s', '--sitepath', action='store', default='.', help="Location of the hyde site")
    subcommands = parser.add_subparsers(title="Hyde commands",
                                     description="Entry points for hyde")
    init_command = subcommands.add_parser('init', help='Create a new hyde site')
    init_command.set_defaults(run=init)
    init_command.add_argument('-t', '--template', action='store', default='basic', dest='template',
                     help='Overwrite the current site if it exists')
    init_command.add_argument('-f', '--force', action='store_true', default=False, dest='force',
                     help='Overwrite the current site if it exists')
    args = parser.parse_args()
    args.run(args)

def init(self, params):
    print params.sitepath
    print params.template
    print params.overwrite

With commando:

class Engine(Application):

    @command(description='hyde - a python static website generator',
            epilog='Use %(prog)s {command} -h to get help on individual commands')
    @param('-v', '--version', action='version', version='%(prog)s ' + __version__)
    @param('-s', '--sitepath', action='store', default='.', help="Location of the hyde site")
    def main(self, params): pass

    @subcommand('init', help='Create a new hyde site')
    @param('-t', '--template', action='store', default='basic', dest='template',
            help='Overwrite the current site if it exists')
    @param('-f', '--force', action='store_true', default=False, dest='overwrite',
            help='Overwrite the current site if it exists')
    def init(self, params):
        print params.sitepath
        print params.template
        print params.overwrite
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, looks interesting! –  georg Apr 2 '13 at 19:02

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