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I've been trying to pass a std::vector to a function by reference with default value being an empty std::vector. The declaration of my function looks as follows:

void function( std::vector<double>& vec=std::vector<double>(0));

The definition of my function is:

void function( std::vector<double>& vec)
{
...
}

However my C++ compiler (gcc 4.6) is throwing an error here, saying:

error: default argument for parameter of type ‘std::vector&’ has type ‘std::vector’

I've seen this version of the code compile fine on a Microsoft VS 2010 compiler. And I'm wondering if this is an issue of different c++ standard interpretation between gcc and vs2010.

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1  
MSVC considered (and I agree) that there is no reason not to be able to bind to non-const reference when you can bind to const ones and have mutable/indirect fields anyway. What I do not agree with is that they thus decided not to follow the Standard... –  Matthieu M. Nov 6 '12 at 10:31
    
@MatthieuM.: Yeah. As always, Microsoft knows best, frak everyone else. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 6 '12 at 11:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't. You can't bind a temporary to a ref-to-non-const, so you could only do this:

void function(const std::vector<double>& vec = std::vector<double>());

In your case, then, I suggest function overloading:

void function(std::vector<double>& vec)
{
    // ...
}

void function()
{
    std::vector<double> v;
    function(v);
}

If you don't like the extra function call then you're out of luck. :)

I don't know whether C++11 rvalue refs might help here, if you have access to them.

I've seen this version of the code compile fine on a Microsoft VS 2010 compiler. And I'm wondering if this is an issue of different c++ standard interpretation between gcc and vs2010.

MSVS has a tendency to allow you to bind temporaries to refs-to-non-const, which is non-standard behaviour. GCC is correct.

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1  
There it is! :) –  Luchian Grigore Nov 6 '12 at 10:21

You can do the following:

namespace{
    auto empty_vec = std::vector<double>();
}

void function(std::vector<double>& vec=empty_vec);

then you do not have to change the signature of your function. But you have to define the variable empty_vec instead. I put it in an unnamed namespace to make it invisible from outside this translation unit. But the drawback is (as LightnessRacesinOrbit noted below) that within this translation unit the value of empty_vec can be changed, which might break your function.

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I like this. Though there's little guarantee that it'll really be empty when it's not "local" to calls to function. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 6 '12 at 10:46
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Isn't it always true that empty_vec.empty() evaluates to true? Or didn't I get your point? –  MWid Nov 6 '12 at 11:05
    
Yes, of course it is. But where's the guarantee that, at any point of your program, empty_vec.empty() evaluates to true? I can trivially fill that vector up from any other place in the entire program and potentially completely break function. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 6 '12 at 11:13
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Ok, I see. –  MWid Nov 6 '12 at 11:25

You can't pass temporary object as nonconst lvalue-reference! Add const qualifier or remove default argument.

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