Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For C++ learning purposes, I have the files class1.h, class1.cpp, class2.h and class2.cpp. I would like to instantiate an object named class1Obj inside class2. Where and how do I instantiate this object? Do I instantiate classObj inside the class2 constructor?

In the past I have created a pointer to a class, which worked well for that time, but I think a pointer is not the route I should take this time because the classObj will only be used inside class2.

share|improve this question
    
Simply add a member variable of type class1 to class2. It will be instantiated upon construction time of a class2 object. –  cli_hlt Nov 6 '12 at 10:28
    
You can instantiate it wherever you want, you need just to write the corresponding correct code. If you do it in the constructor, it is better though. How to instantiate: Class1 Instance; –  ISTB Nov 6 '12 at 10:33
    
You dont need an explicit 'new' operator to instantiate. So A variable is enough –  madhairsilence Nov 6 '12 at 10:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
class class1
{
   //...
};

class class2
{
   class1 member; 
   //...
};

In class2 ctor, you can initialize member in the constructor initialization list.

class2::class2(...)
: member(...)
{
   //...
}
share|improve this answer

Well how did you create a pointer in the past? Presumably, you did something like this:

class class2
{
  public:
    class2()
    {
      class1Pointer = new class1();
    }
    // Destructor, copy constructor/assignment, etc...
  private:
    class1* class1Pointer;
};

Now you want to do exactly the same but this time you don't want a pointer to class1, you want a class1 itself:

class class2
{
  public:
    class2() {}
    // Destructor, copy constructor/assignment, etc...
  private:
    class1 class1Obj;
};

The object will be default initialized when your class2 object is created. If your class1 constructor should take some arguments, use an initialization list:

class class2
{
  public:
    class2() : class1Obj(1, 2, 3) {}
    // Destructor, copy constructor/assignment, etc...
  private:
    class1 class1Obj;
};
share|improve this answer

It depends on your Class1. If its constructor accepts some parameters, then you must initialize it explicitly in Class2 constructor or in initialization list.

Class2 {
public:

    class2() {
        //Here m_class1Obj will be instantiated
        m_class1Obj = Class1(/*some params*/);
    }

private:
    Class1 m_class1Obj;
};

Or

Class2 {
public:

    class2() : m_class1Obj() {}

private:
    Class1 m_class1Obj;
};
share|improve this answer
2  
Except you aren't showing initialization, you are showing assignment. –  john Nov 6 '12 at 10:36
    
-1 for not using constructor initialization list. What if M_class1Obj were const? How would you do it then? –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 6 '12 at 10:37
1  
Constructive critics. Updated. –  besworland Nov 6 '12 at 10:39

Instantiate a class inside a class :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;



class Foo 
{
 public:
     Foo(int i) 
     {

     }  
};

class Bar  
{     
  Foo i;  //<--- instantiate a class inside a class ----
  public:

  Bar() : i(1)  //<--- instantiate a class inside a class ----
  {

  }  
};





int main(void)
{


  Bar b;




  cout<<" \nPress any key to continue\n";
  cin.ignore();
  cin.get();

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.