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So tipically if you install Neo4j in your development environment, you will have a local hosted version of the Neo4Jserver, which usually you can browse with: localhost:7474/db/data.

Your code is like this:

var client = new GraphClient(new Uri("http://localhost:7474/db/data"));
client.Connect();

However, one day you will want to connect to your Cloud-based Neo4J Server (Heroku, Azure, etc.) Of course, that means you will have to provide Network credentials. If you only use your bare hands, it could be like this:

var http = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(new Uri("http://<<your_REST_query"));
var cred = new NetworkCredential("yourusername", "yourpassword");

http.Credentials = cred;

var response = http.GetResponse();
var stream = response.GetResponseStream();

But how can I include network credentials to connect with Neo4JClient? or is there another option that I don't know?

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The constructor for GraphClient does accept a IHttpClient, not sure if that might tie the two together. –  rball Nov 7 '12 at 23:34
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

We support the standard URI syntax for basic authentication credentials:

var client = new GraphClient(new Uri("http://user:pass@localhost:7474/db/data"));
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This is now documented on bitbucket.org/Readify/neo4jclient/wiki/connecting –  Tatham Oddie Mar 22 '13 at 4:46
    
This doesn't seem to work. –  rball Apr 4 '13 at 6:13
    
Do your username or password have a colon or @ symbol in them? If not, please open an issue at bitbucket.org/Readify/neo4jclient/issues/new so that we can identify and fix the bug. –  Tatham Oddie Apr 4 '13 at 8:30
    
No, they are just alphanumeric randomly generated by Heroku. var graphClient = new GraphClient(new Uri("http://LOGIN:PASSWORD@SERVER.hosted.neo4j.org:7259/db/data"));graphClient.C‌​onnect(); also with a trailing slash. Just want to make sure it's not me doing something stupid. –  rball Apr 4 '13 at 14:25
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