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So I'm using Python 2.7, using the json module to encode the following data structure.

'layer1': {
    'layer2': {
        'layer3_1': [ long_list_of_stuff ],
        'layer3_2': 'string'
    }
}

My problem is that I'm printing everything out using pretty printing, as follows:

json.dumps(data_structure, indent=2)

Which is great, except I want to indent it all, except for the content in layer3_1 - It's a massive dictionary listing coordinates, and as such, having a single value set on each one makes pretty printing create a file with thousands of lines, with an example as follows:

{
  "layer1": {
    "layer2": {
      "layer3_1": [
        {
          "x": 1,
          "y": 7
        },
        {
          "x": 0,
          "y": 4
        },
        {
          "x": 5,
          "y": 3
        },
        {
          "x": 6,
          "y": 9
        }
      ],
      "layer3_2": "string"
    }
  }
}

What I really want is something similar to the following:

{
  "layer1": {
    "layer2": {
      "layer3_1": [{"x":1,"y":7},{"x":0,"y":4},{"x":5,"y":3},{"x":6,"y":9}],
      "layer3_2": "string"
    }
  }
}

I hear it's possible to extend the json module: Is it possible to set it to only turn off indenting when inside the layer3_1 object? If so, could somebody please be so kind as to help me out?

share|improve this question
4  
Your first code snippet is neither JSON nor Python. – user647772 Nov 6 '12 at 10:51
    
Indentation is a matter of printing, not of representation. – Yuval Adam Nov 6 '12 at 10:53
    
For "pretty printing" you mean you're using the pprint module? – Bakuriu Nov 6 '12 at 10:55
    
Amended the first snippet to something recognisable. And I'm using json.dumps(data_structure, indent=2) - Added that as an example. – Rohaq Nov 6 '12 at 10:57
    
I've posted a solution that works on 2.7 and plays nicely with options such as sort_keys and does not have special case implementation for sort order and instead relies on (composition with) collections.OrderedDict. – Erik Allik Sep 19 '14 at 14:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

FWIW, after much ado, I was able to more or less get J.F.Sebastian's original idea to work. Here's the result after I enhanced it to print the keys of each coordinate dict in sorted order as per one of the OP's comments:

import json

class NoIndent(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
    def __repr__(self):
        if not isinstance(self.value, (list, tuple)):
            return repr(self.value)
        else:  # assume it's a list or tuple of coordinates stored as dicts
            delimiters = '[]' if isinstance(self.value, list) else '()'
            pairs = ('{!r}:{}'.format(*component)
                         for coordinate in self.value
                             for component in sorted(coordinate.items()))
            pairs = ('{{{}, {}}}'.format(*pair)
                         for pair in zip(*[iter(pairs)]*2))
            return delimiters[0] + ', '.join(pairs) + delimiters[1]

class MyEncoder(json.JSONEncoder):
    def default(self, obj):
        return(repr(obj) if isinstance(obj, NoIndent) else
               json.JSONEncoder.default(self, obj))

data_structure = {
    'layer1': {
        'layer2': {
            'layer3_1': NoIndent([{"x":1,"y":7}, {"x":0,"y":4},
                                  {"x":5,"y":3}, {"x":6,"y":9}]),
            'layer3_2': 'string'
        }
    }
}

print json.dumps(data_structure, cls=MyEncoder, indent=2)

Output:

{
  "layer1": {
    "layer2": {
      "layer3_2": "string", 
      "layer3_1": "[{'x':1, 'y':7}, {'x':0, 'y':4}, {'x':5, 'y':3}, {'x':6, 'y':9}]"
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, I got this working, but wanted to sort the x and y for vanity's sake (parts of the JSON produced needs to be hand edited later on, don't ask why :(), so I tried using an OrderedDict. Now my problem is that I get the following in my output: "layer3_1": "[OrderedDict([('x', 804), ('y', 622)]), OrderedDict([('x', 817), ('y', 635)]), OrderedDict([('x', 817), ('y', 664)]), OrderedDict([('x', 777), (' y', 664)]), OrderedDict([('x', 777), ('y', 622)]), OrderedDict([('x', 804), ('y' , 622)])]", I think I'm missing something... – Rohaq Nov 6 '12 at 17:21
    
@Rohaq: Realize that you can make the isinstance(obj, NoIndent) case do almost whatever you want. Specifically, return a string formatted the way you would like from obj. One relatively easy way to implement something like that would be to add a custom __repr__() method to the NoIndent class. – martineau Nov 6 '12 at 20:03
    
That works brilliantly, thank you! – Rohaq Nov 7 '12 at 12:33
6  
This still prints the list as a string instead. – Erik Allik Sep 19 '14 at 13:20
1  
@ErikAllik was exactly right. The list became a string: "[{'x':1, 'y':7}, {'x':0, 'y':4}, {'x':5, 'y':3}, {'x':6, 'y':9}]". This is a wrong answer! – Jennya Chang Feb 16 at 2:16

A bodge, but once you have the string from dumps(), you can perform a regular expression substitution on it, if you're sure of the format of its contents. Something along the lines of:

s = json.dumps(data_structure, indent=2)
s = re.sub('\s*{\s*"(.)": (\d+),\s*"(.)": (\d+)\s*}(,?)\s*', r'{"\1":\2,"\3":\4}\5', s)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this worked too, and is indeed smaller, but decided to go with the solution provided by @martineau – Rohaq Nov 7 '12 at 16:37

The following solution seems to work correctly on Python 2.7.x. It uses a workaround taken from Custom JSON encoder in Python 2.7 to insert plain JavaScript code to avoid custom-encoded objects ending up as JSON strings in the output by using a UUID-based replacement scheme.

class NoIndent(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value


class NoIndentEncoder(json.JSONEncoder):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(NoIndentEncoder, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.kwargs = dict(kwargs)
        del self.kwargs['indent']
        self._replacement_map = {}

    def default(self, o):
        if isinstance(o, NoIndent):
            key = uuid.uuid4().hex
            self._replacement_map[key] = json.dumps(o.value, **self.kwargs)
            return "@@%s@@" % (key,)
        else:
            return super(NoIndentEncoder, self).default(o)

    def encode(self, o):
        result = super(NoIndentEncoder, self).encode(o)
        for k, v in self._replacement_map.iteritems():
            result = result.replace('"@@%s@@"' % (k,), v)
        return result

Then this

obj = {
  "layer1": {
    "layer2": {
      "layer3_2": "string", 
      "layer3_1": NoIndent([{"y": 7, "x": 1}, {"y": 4, "x": 0}, {"y": 3, "x": 5}, {"y": 9, "x": 6}])
    }
  }
}
print json.dumps(obj, indent=2, cls=NoIndentEncoder)

produces the follwing output:

{
  "layer1": {
    "layer2": {
      "layer3_2": "string", 
      "layer3_1": [{"y": 7, "x": 1}, {"y": 4, "x": 0}, {"y": 3, "x": 5}, {"y": 9, "x": 6}]
    }
  }
}

It also correctly passes all options (except indent) e.g. sort_keys=True down to the nested json.dumps call.

obj = {
    "layer1": {
        "layer2": {
            "layer3_1": NoIndent([{"y": 7, "x": 1, }, {"y": 4, "x": 0}, {"y": 3, "x": 5, }, {"y": 9, "x": 6}]),
            "layer3_2": "string",
        }
    }
}    
print json.dumps(obj, indent=2, sort_keys=True, cls=NoIndentEncoder)

correctly outputs:

{
  "layer1": {
    "layer2": {
      "layer3_1": [{"x": 1, "y": 7}, {"x": 0, "y": 4}, {"x": 5, "y": 3}, {"x": 6, "y": 9}], 
      "layer3_2": "string"
    }
  }
}

It can also be combined with e.g. collections.OrderedDict:

obj = {
    "layer1": {
        "layer2": {
            "layer3_2": "string",
            "layer3_3": NoIndent(OrderedDict([("b", 1), ("a", 2)]))
        }
    }
}
print json.dumps(obj, indent=2, cls=NoIndentEncoder)

outputs:

{
  "layer1": {
    "layer2": {
      "layer3_3": {"b": 1, "a": 2}, 
      "layer3_2": "string"
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For those who don't understand how this solution works: The two lines for k, v in self._replacement_map.iteritems(): result = result.replace('"@@%s@@"' % (k,), v) inside encode(), is to replace "layer3_1": "@@d4e06719f9cb420a82ace98becab5ff8@@" to "layer3_1": [{"y": 7, "x": 1}, {"y": 4, "x": 0}, {"y": 3, "x": 5}, {"y": 9, "x": 6}]. I think this solution in some sense equals to @M Somerville's re substitution solution. – Jennya Chang Feb 16 at 2:42
    
This works in Python 3 as well. The only caveat is that you must use json.dumps, not json.dump! In the latter case you would have to override iterencode() as well and I couldn't get that working. – letmaik Jun 10 at 13:43

You could try:

  • mark lists that shouldn't be indented by replacing them with NoIndentList:

    class NoIndentList(list):
        pass
    
  • override json.Encoder.default method to produce a non-indented string representation for NoIndentList.

    You could just cast it back to list and call json.dumps() without indent to get a single line

It seems the above approach doesn't work for the json module:

import json
import sys

class NoIndent(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

def default(o, encoder=json.JSONEncoder()):
    if isinstance(o, NoIndent):
        return json.dumps(o.value)
    return encoder.default(o)

L = [dict(x=x, y=y) for x in range(1) for y in range(2)]
obj = [NoIndent(L), L]
json.dump(obj, sys.stdout, default=default, indent=4)

It produces invalid output (the list is serialized as a string):

[
    "[{\"y\": 0, \"x\": 0}, {\"y\": 1, \"x\": 0}]", 
    [
        {
            "y": 0, 
            "x": 0
        }, 
        {
            "y": 1, 
            "x": 0
        }
    ]
]

If you can use yaml then the method works:

import sys
import yaml

class NoIndentList(list):
    pass

def noindent_list_presenter(dumper, data):
    return dumper.represent_sequence(u'tag:yaml.org,2002:seq', data,
                                     flow_style=True)
yaml.add_representer(NoIndentList, noindent_list_presenter)


obj = [
    [dict(x=x, y=y) for x in range(2) for y in range(1)],
    [dict(x=x, y=y) for x in range(1) for y in range(2)],
    ]
obj[0] = NoIndentList(obj[0])
yaml.dump(obj, stream=sys.stdout, indent=4)

It produces:

- [{x: 0, y: 0}, {x: 1, y: 0}]
-   - {x: 0, y: 0}
    - {x: 0, y: 1}

i.e., the first list is serialized using [] and all items are on one line, the second list uses one line per item.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think I get half of what you're saying, though I am a little confused. Probably down to me not having to override methods in Python before though. I'll do a bit more reading, but if you could provide a more complete example, it would be appreciated! – Rohaq Nov 6 '12 at 11:36
    
I understand how to override methods, etc, but when I call json.dumps(data_structure, cls=MyEncoder) it doesn't use my custom json.JSONEncoder subclass's default() method. And, yes, I have NoIndentList instances in the data_structure. – martineau Nov 6 '12 at 12:04
    
@Rohaq: I've updated the answer. – J.F. Sebastian Nov 6 '12 at 12:23
    
@martineau: It seems you shouldn't subclass from list. To force default() usage subclass from object as in NoIndent example above. – J.F. Sebastian Nov 6 '12 at 12:28
    
Unfortunately changing NoIndent as you suggested results in a RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded in File ".../lib/json/encoder.py", line 264, in iterencode and my custom JSONEncoder subclass still doesn't appear to ever be used. I think there's a bug in the json module. – martineau Nov 6 '12 at 12:40

This solution is not so elegant and generic as the others and you will not learn much from it but it's quick and simple.

def custom_print(data_structure, indent):
    for key, value in data_structure.items():
        print "\n%s%s:" % (' '*indent,str(key)),
        if isinstance(value, dict):
            custom_print(value, indent+1)
        else:
            print "%s" % (str(value)),

Usage and output:

>>> custom_print(data_structure,1)

 layer1:
  layer2:
   layer3_2: string
   layer3_1: [{'y': 7, 'x': 1}, {'y': 4, 'x': 0}, {'y': 3, 'x': 5}, {'y': 9, 'x': 6}]
share|improve this answer

Here's a post-processing solution if you have too many different types of objects contributing to the JSON to attempt the JSONEncoder method and too many varying types to use a regex. This function collapses whitespace after a specified level, without needing to know the specifics of the data itself.

def collapse_json(text, indent=12):
    """Compacts a string of json data by collapsing whitespace after the
    specified indent level

    NOTE: will not produce correct results when indent level is not a multiple
    of the json indent level
    """
    initial = " " * indent
    out = []  # final json output
    sublevel = []  # accumulation list for sublevel entries
    pending = None  # holder for consecutive entries at exact indent level
    for line in text.splitlines():
        if line.startswith(initial):
            if line[indent] == " ":
                # found a line indented further than the indent level, so add
                # it to the sublevel list
                if pending:
                    # the first item in the sublevel will be the pending item
                    # that was the previous line in the json
                    sublevel.append(pending)
                    pending = None
                item = line.strip()
                sublevel.append(item)
                if item.endswith(","):
                    sublevel.append(" ")
            elif sublevel:
                # found a line at the exact indent level *and* we have sublevel
                # items. This means the sublevel items have come to an end
                sublevel.append(line.strip())
                out.append("".join(sublevel))
                sublevel = []
            else:
                # found a line at the exact indent level but no items indented
                # further, so possibly start a new sub-level
                if pending:
                    # if there is already a pending item, it means that
                    # consecutive entries in the json had the exact same
                    # indentation and that last pending item was not the start
                    # of a new sublevel.
                    out.append(pending)
                pending = line.rstrip()
        else:
            if pending:
                # it's possible that an item will be pending but not added to
                # the output yet, so make sure it's not forgotten.
                out.append(pending)
                pending = None
            if sublevel:
                out.append("".join(sublevel))
            out.append(line)
    return "\n".join(out)

For example, using this structure as input to json.dumps with an indent level of 4:

text = json.dumps({"zero": ["first", {"second": 2, "third": 3, "fourth": 4, "items": [[1,2,3,4], [5,6,7,8], 9, 10, [11, [12, [13, [14, 15]]]]]}]}, indent=4)

here's the output of the function at various indent levels:

>>> print collapse_json(text, indent=0)
{"zero": ["first", {"items": [[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7, 8], 9, 10, [11, [12, [13, [14, 15]]]]], "second": 2, "fourth": 4, "third": 3}]}
>>> print collapse_json(text, indent=4)
{
    "zero": ["first", {"items": [[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7, 8], 9, 10, [11, [12, [13, [14, 15]]]]], "second": 2, "fourth": 4, "third": 3}]
}
>>> print collapse_json(text, indent=8)
{
    "zero": [
        "first",
        {"items": [[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7, 8], 9, 10, [11, [12, [13, [14, 15]]]]], "second": 2, "fourth": 4, "third": 3}
    ]
}
>>> print collapse_json(text, indent=12)
{
    "zero": [
        "first", 
        {
            "items": [[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7, 8], 9, 10, [11, [12, [13, [14, 15]]]]],
            "second": 2,
            "fourth": 4,
            "third": 3
        }
    ]
}
>>> print collapse_json(text, indent=16)
{
    "zero": [
        "first", 
        {
            "items": [
                [1, 2, 3, 4],
                [5, 6, 7, 8],
                9,
                10,
                [11, [12, [13, [14, 15]]]]
            ], 
            "second": 2, 
            "fourth": 4, 
            "third": 3
        }
    ]
}
share|improve this answer

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