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I need to implement the following markup: enter image description here

The problem is that I can use only HTML+CSS and XSLT to produce it.

I thought of writing a template that would split the text into lines with XSL and print each line as a different paragraph <p> with border-bottom set. Is there a simpler way to achieve this by means of HTML+CSS?

A small update: The point here is to have this underline extend past the text and take all the available width. So all lines are of the same length (like lines in a copybook), except the first one which may be shorter

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Are you only asking for help with the underlining, or do you need help with the strikethrough and colouring as well? –  Sir Crispalot Nov 6 '12 at 11:04
    
Do you want to use multi level dom elements or this should be done with single level markup. –  kumars Nov 6 '12 at 11:11
    
No, I can deal with colouring. I wish to know how to make this underline lines of equal length. –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 11:54
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5 Answers

You can use an inline element such as <span> which will treat border-bottom like underline:

<p>
    <span>
        <del>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit,</del> sed do
eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam
    </span>
</p>

and CSS:

span {
    border-bottom: 4px solid black;
}
del {
    color: red;
}

Demo here.

Result using the markup above:

result in Chrome

EDIT:

1.

Extending @aefxx's answer, if you can use CSS3 try this:

.strike {
    background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top , rgba(255, 255, 255, 0) 34px, #000000 34px, #000000 38px);
    background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(rgba(255, 255, 255, 0) 34px, #000000 34px, #000000 38px);
    background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0) 34px, #000000 34px, #000000 38px);
    background-repeat: repeat-y;
    background-size: 100% 38px;
}
p {
    line-height: 38px;
}
p:before {
    background: #fff;
    content:"\00a0";
    display: inline-block;
    height: 38px;
    width: 50px;
}
del span {
    color: red;
}

​Demo here - this will only work in the latest browsers including Firefox and Chrome.

Result in Chrome:

result using gradient


2.

If you're happy with justified text:

p,span {
    border-bottom: 4px solid black;
    line-height: 30px;
    text-align: justify;
    text-indent: 50px;
}
p>span {
    padding-bottom: 5px;
    vertical-align: top;
}
del span {
    border-bottom: 0 none;
    color: red;
}

Demo here. ​There are some issues with line-height but should be easy to figure out.

Result in Chrome:

enter image description here


Other than that, I'm afraid you might have to wrap your lines in some containers.

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For different line-through colour look here: css-strikethrough-different-color-from-text –  jfrej Nov 6 '12 at 11:26
    
There is a small problem with your example with <span> lines ending where the text ends. So the right edge is "ripped". At least that's what I'm getting in IE8. –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 11:36
    
@svz sorry, I didn't notice that at first! I'll think about a fix for that. –  jfrej Nov 6 '12 at 11:40
    
Thanks for the great answer. The option with justified text almost worked. The only thing there is that IE8 doesn't draw an underline on the last line of text >.< –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 14:00
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Probably won't get any better than this with pure markup: jsfiddle demo.

EDIT
Update based on the questionaire's comment:

Preview:
enter image description here

p span.indent {
    width: 160px; height: 30px;
    vertical-align: top;
    background: #fff;
    display: inline-block;
}

p span.strike {
    color: #000;
    text-decoration: line-through;
}    

p del {
    color: #ff0000;
    text-decoration: none;
}

p {
    width: 490px;
    font-family: Arial, sans-serif;
    line-height: 30px;
    background: url('http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/1889/63051094.gif') left top;
}
<p>
    <span class="indent"></span><span class="strike"><del>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod</del></span> tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation
</p>
share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is that this underline should extend past the text and take all the available width. The right edge should be straight and not ripped like in your example. –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 11:41
    
@svz It now spans accross the entire paragraph. This solution involves a background image and an extra span to indent (which hides the bottom border). –  aefxx Nov 6 '12 at 12:04
    
Sorry, but no background images. Only HTML+CSS. I even tried to use a background <table> =) –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 12:06
    
Then, I'm afraid, you will have to split things up into different paragraphs or go with non-stretching borders as in the first place. Why can't you use background images, btw? –  aefxx Nov 6 '12 at 12:08
    
That's what I was afraid of. And the images are a long story. That's just one of the requirements which is supposed to "improve performance". Not up to me to decide. –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 12:12
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Make a div around the content for which you want that formatting and use that div inside a CSS to make necesssary formatting.

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HTML

<div id="content">
<p><span id="strike">some content that you need to display</span>
<span id="underline">Some more content that will come here</span></p>
</div>​

CSS

    #content
    {
        height:auto;
        width:200px;
    }
    #content #strike
    {
        text-decoration:line-through;
        color:Red;
    }

    #content #underline
    {
     text-decoration:underline;   
    }

    span
   {
    border-bottom:4px solid Black;
   }

Live Sample

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Why do you use IDs on the span tags? A class can be used several times, while an ID can only be used once. And using the <del> tag would be more semantic. It defines text that has been deleted from a document. –  joko13 Nov 6 '12 at 11:32
    
@joko13: well that depends. We only have the design to go on, we don’t actually know what the text is meant to represent. –  Paul D. Waite Nov 6 '12 at 13:18
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You don’t actually need each line to be in its own HTML element to have a bottom border. You can apply borders to inline elements, and the border will be applied to each line in the element.

In order to make the strike-through colour be different from the text colour, you need an additional HTML element in there as well. (Although Firefox has implemented -moz-text-decoration-color.)

HTML

<span class="fake-underline">
    <del><span>Final blitz by Obama and Romney as election arrives.</span></del> Candidates attend rallies late into the night as US prepares to go to the polls.
</span>

CSS

.fake-underline {
    line-height: 2;
    border-bottom: solid 5px black;
}
del {
    text-decoration: line-through;
}
del span {
    color: red;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is del {text-decoration: line-through;} necessary? –  freebird Nov 6 '12 at 11:27
    
The problem here is that if I use a single element like <span> the right edge of the lines will be "ripped" with lines ending where the text ends. And I need all the lines to go past text and end at the same level –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 11:46
    
@svz: ah! Yes I see. That is a tricky one. You could wrap a <p> around the <span> and set that to text-align:justify, but obv your screenshot doesn’t have justified text, it just has the lines flush to the edge of the block-level element. –  Paul D. Waite Nov 6 '12 at 13:17
    
Yes, the text is not justified there. My ideas so far are to use a monospace font and break the text into different html elements or to use a <p>-<span> combination with a table on top of it for the lines. –  svz Nov 6 '12 at 13:31
    
I’m not quite clear how a <table> would help you. If you fix the height of the lines in px then you could use a repeating background image (which, as it would be reasonably small, could be applied inline in the CSS using a data url) on the enclosing block level element to achieve the underlines. At this point though, I’d question whether the visual effect was really worth the coding and subsequent maintenance effort. Could the lines not just end where the text ends? –  Paul D. Waite Nov 6 '12 at 15:18
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