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I have one c# function which returns me List of States. I want this function should get called only once like static variable.




    public List GetStateList()
    {
       List lstState=new List();
       lstState.add("State1");
       lstState.add("State2");
       lstState.add("State3");

       return lstState;
    }

I m calling this function from many places since this state list is going to be same so i want this function should get called only once, and next time when this function is getting called it should not re create the whole list again.

How could i achieve this in c#.

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1  
return the same(static?) list in each call. –  L.B Nov 6 '12 at 12:02
    
Please upload your code here............. –  andy Nov 6 '12 at 12:03
1  
This question appears to betray a serious misunderstanding of what static means, or what the intended outcome really is. We really need a lot more information about what you really want. –  Quick Joe Smith Nov 6 '12 at 12:03
1  
static bool called = false; if(!called) { UpdateList(); called = true; }. There you go. –  Aesthete Nov 6 '12 at 12:09
1  
The easy solution would be to check to see if lstState is empty. Of course you would have to fix your overal design flaw to do this –  Ramhound Nov 6 '12 at 12:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Memoise it. It'll still be called multiple times, but only do the full work once:

private List<string> _states; //if GetStateList() doesn't depend on object
                              //state, then this can be static.
public List GetStateList()
{
   if(_states == null)
   {
     List lstState=new List();
     lstState.add("State1");
     lstState.add("State2");
     lstState.add("State3");
     _states = lstState;
   }
   return _states;
}

Depending on threading issues, you may wish to either:

  1. Lock on the whole thing. Guaranteed single execution.
  2. Lock on the assignment to _states. There may be some needless work in the early period, but all callers will receive the same object.
  3. Allow for early callers to overwrite each other.

While the last may seem the most wasteful, it can be the best in the long run, as after the initial period where different calls may needlessly overwrite each other, it becomes a simpler and faster from that point on. It really depends on just how much work is done, and how often it may be concurrently called prior to _states being assigned to.

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You can use double-checked locking, or, more simply, you can forego the bother of lazy instantiation and just create the list upfront. There's not enough overhead in memory or CPU in the creation of a list of states to warrant the effort. –  Quick Joe Smith Nov 6 '12 at 13:09

One issue with reusing a list is that callers can modify this list, which will affect any pre-existing references to it. For such a small amount of data, this isn't likely to save you very much in the long run. I'd probably be content to just return a new array each time.

I certainly wouldn't bother with lazy instantiation; populate it in the constructor and be done:

public static class States {
    static States() {
        All = Array.AsReadOnly(new string[] { "state1", "state2", "state3" });
    }
    public static readonly ReadOnlyCollection<string> All;
}

Now it's thread-safe, (relatively) tamper-proof, and above all, simple.

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