Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have this table

ID  |  Seq  
------------
 A      1      
 A      2      
 A      3      
 B      1      
 B      2     
 B      3     
 B      3     <--duplicate seq where ID=B
 C      1     
 C      2
 C      4     <--missing seq id number 3
 D      1
 D      2
 .      .
 .      .

Is there a way to detect if/when there is an error in the logic of the Seq column, specifically if there are jumps and/or duplicates.

share|improve this question
3  
which RDBMS ? sql server.. or mysql ? or Oracle? –  Joe G Joseph Nov 6 '12 at 12:16
    
This is for SQL server, but I deeply appreciate simple code that may even be compatible with oracle –  jenswirf Nov 6 '12 at 12:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

try this:

this should work both in sql server as well as Oracle

select ID,seq
       from(
            select ID,seq,
                   row_number() over (partition by id order by seq ) rn
            from t_seq)a
where a.seq<>a.rn


SQL fiddle demo for SQL server


SQL Fiddle demo for Oracle

share|improve this answer

These are both SQL agnostic so should work in just about any rdbms.

This will check for a break in the sequence:

select t1.id, t1.seq
from t_seq t1
where
  t1.seq <> 1
  and not exists (
    select *
     from t_seq t2
    where t2.id = t1.id
      and t2.seq = t1. seq - 1    
)

This will check for duplicates:

select t1.id, t1.seq
from mytable t1
group by t1.id, t1.se1
having count(*) > 1
share|improve this answer

To get the duplicates you can use the following T-SQL.

 SELECT ID, Seq FROM MyTable GROUP BY ID, Seq HAVING COUNT(Seq) > 1

Edit

To find out the missing sequence numbers I have updated the code provided by njr101 to follows:

SELECT ID, Seq FROM MyTable t1 WHERE ID IN ( 
    SELECT ID FROM MyTable    
    GROUP BY ID
    HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT Seq) <> MAX(Seq)
) AND t1.seq <> 1 AND NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT * FROM MyTable t2 WHERE t2.id=t1.id AND t2.seq = t1.seq - 1
)
ORDER BY ID

The first sub query counts the number of distinct rows for that ID (ignores duplicates). If that number is the same is the maximum number contained in the result set, the values should be fine for that ID. If it is not equal, the results will be available in the sub query.

The second part (with the help of njr101's query), filters the result set to only contain the last ID and seq where missing values should be inserted. Results below:

My Data
=========
A   1
A   2
A   3
A   20 <--- Missing (displayed in results)
B   1
B   2
B   3
B   3
B   4
C   1
C   2
C   4 <--- Missing (displayed in results)
C   5
C   15 <--- Missing (displayed in results)
C   16

Results
=======
A   20
C   4
C   15
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.