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I'm executing a PL/SQL blocks that updates some rows from an explicit cursor. The code to declare the cursor is the following:

cursor DUP_SUBJECTS is  
  select * 
    from ODS_SUBJECT_D  
   WHERE SUBJECT_COD = ANY (SELECT SUBJECT_COD  
                              FROM ODS_SUBJECT_D  
                             WHERE END_DATE = TO_DATE ('31-12-9999','DD-MM-YYYY')   
                             GROUP BY SUBJECT_COD, ROW_TYPE_DE  
                            HAVING COUNT(*) > 1)  
   ORDER BY SUBJECT_COD, START_DATE; 

The first statement in the body is a DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE in order to notify when it starts to executing the block. The query in the above script returns 20000 rows out of 2900000 rows in the table. It seems to take very long time in the declaration block of the script (after 30 minutes it does not print the message yet).
Any suggestion to optimize the performances of the script?

Thanks,
Antonio

share|improve this question

You misunderstand how DBMS_OUTPUT works. The client can't receive messages sent to DBMS_OUTPUT until your code block finishes running in it's entirety. You can verify this by adding timestamps to your DBMS_OUTPUT messages. I suspect that you'll see that the first message is written almost immediately and that the actual bottleneck is somewhere else.

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You might try a different way of writing the query:

cursor dup_subjects is  
  select
    * 
  from (
    select
      o.*,
      count(*) over (partition by subject_cod, row_type_de) count_per
    from
      ods_subject_d
    where
      end_date = date '9999-12-31')
  where
    count_per > 1
  order by
    subject_cod,
    start_date;

Make sure that end_date is indexed if that is not a very common value -- if you do not query on end_date very often except for this value then consider indexing on:

create index ...
on     ods_subject_d (
         case end_date
           when date '9999-12-31' then 1
         end)

... and change that predicate to ...

where case end_date when date '9999-12-31' then 1 end = 1

It might be possible to further refine the indexing and query with more knowledge on the distribution of values and likelihood of meeting the "count(*) > 1" condition.

share|improve this answer

if your pl/sql block is taking longer time to run and is not coming out of the program, then you need to create indexes on appropriate columns.

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