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I want to be able to take input with a function but I want to store the information. Is there anyway to declare a variable that doesn't have a name and only can be accessed by a pointer?

something like this:

float* = float NULL 5;

Thanks.

EDITED: What I needed to do was to have an infinite amount of arrays that store a very large amount of ints. However, I am loading all this data from files and I need to access it from many other classes. I know how many times the function is run so i can keep them in an array but I don't know how many ints are or potentially are loaded

So the pointers son't need to have names because they will be stored in an array to be used later. I just wanted to be able to create global variables multiple times and just access them from an array.

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closed as not a real question by Ed Heal, md5, sepp2k, Patrick, Blue Moon Nov 6 '12 at 13:09

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
lets say float* = float NULL 5; is valid. how would you think the access to this pointer will look like ? –  Roee Gavirel Nov 6 '12 at 13:03
    
I'd be interested to know, what would the advantage be to this in your mind? –  Mike Nov 6 '12 at 13:11
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Actually, there is a way, in which it can indeed be done. Is it possible to reopen the question, so that i can add an answer? –  anishsane Nov 6 '12 at 23:38
    
@anishsane I don't believe so. But I figured out how to do what I wanted anyways. thanks. –  BlueSpud Nov 8 '12 at 0:10

8 Answers 8

The answer is NO. You have to have memory allocated for the variable.

Either the function (that returns value) should allocate memory, or your caller function.

But what you are trying to do is not even fitting C syntax.

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What about compound literals and construction like float* ptr = (float[]){5}? –  codewarrior Nov 6 '12 at 13:16
    
@codewarrior: In that case, the memory allocated is read only memory; in const segment. But memory is allocated & pointer points to a valid location. –  anishsane Nov 6 '12 at 13:18
    
I would only like to answer the question: "Is there anyway to declare a variable that doesn't have a name and only can be accessed by a pointer?" - in this case there is! –  codewarrior Nov 6 '12 at 13:24
    
Then malloc is also a possible answer? –  anishsane Nov 6 '12 at 13:26
    
In that sense YES. You have variable without name and can access it using pointer. –  codewarrior Nov 6 '12 at 13:28

Well, you can allocate new memory from the heap with malloc(), and store stuff in there. That is probably what you want, the function can then return the pointer and hand it over to other functions. When the data is no longer needed, it should be de-allocated with free().

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The simple answer is NO! So why do you want to do this daft thing?

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What I needed to do was to have an infinite amount of arrays that store a very large amount of ints. However, I am loading all this data from files and I need to access it from many other classes. I know how many times the function is run so i can keep them in an array but I don't know how many ints are or potentially are loaded – –  BlueSpud Nov 6 '12 at 13:32

No. You could invent a name that you're not using otherwise:

 float myFloatINTERNAL_DONTUSE;
 float * const myFloat = &myFloatINTERNAL_DONTUSE;

but what for? Just declare an ordinary local variable and use the & operator when you need its address.

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Yes you can.

float* p = malloc(sizeof(*p)); 

You nave a named pointer variable p, but the object it points to has no name. Don't forget to free the memory later.

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He does not want any name for pointer either, I think... –  anishsane Nov 6 '12 at 13:04
    
@anishane: Why do you think so? –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 6 '12 at 13:04
    
From whatever snippet he has posted... –  anishsane Nov 6 '12 at 13:05
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@anishsane: His snippet made ZERO sense to me, so I chose to ignore it and instead answer his textual question –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 6 '12 at 13:05
    
Do not cast the return of malloc and I usually advice to use sizeof(*p) so you won't have to change anything anytime (and this goes for any type of p) –  Eregrith Nov 6 '12 at 13:07

No, C standart (so obviously your compiler too) doesn't support a variables without names. When you declare a pointer om something, you must give it a name too.
Well, what you want to do there, reasonably, is to create a variable in heap and then access it by a pointer with name:

float * const ptr = malloc(sizeof(float));

That's it, so here you go.

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Suppose, there had been a way, to do it,

How would you access the variable without using a name?

Even pointer is a "named pointer variable" :-)

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What I needed to do was to have an infinite amount of arrays that store a very large amount of ints. However, I am loading all this data from files and I need to access it from many other classes. I know how many times the function is run so i can keep them in an array but I don't know how many ints are or potentially are loaded –  BlueSpud Nov 6 '12 at 13:32
    
Then create a linked list? We can later optimize in terms of memory in case this is the desired solution. (linked list need additional memory for next pointer & would be costly, if data is 4 bytes int & next is also 4 byte ptr) –  anishsane Nov 6 '12 at 13:35
    
Yes. load a bunch of files. put them all in an array and do something to all of them. get rid of them. –  BlueSpud Nov 6 '12 at 13:40

Besides dynamically allocated objects (created using malloc) there are also supported from C99 compound literals.

E.g. construction like below

char **foo = (char *[]) { "x", "y", "z" };

or for your purposes

float *ptr = (float[]){5};

construct an array and actually you have only pointer to it without having object name itself.

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