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Environment:

R v. 2.15.1 on Mac OS 10.8.2, platform x86_64-apple-darwin9.8.0/x86_64 (64-bit), with RStudio IDE which is set to use UTF-8 as its default encoding. The OS also uses UTF-8.

> Sys.getlocale(category = "LC_ALL")
[1] "sk_SK.UTF-8/sk_SK.UTF-8/sk_SK.UTF-8/C/sk_SK.UTF-8/sk_SK.UTF-8"

Objective:

Generate an HTML file from the R HTML (.Rhtml) file, containing a plot with extended latin characters, such as š or č.

Problem:

When I click on Knit HTML, the output looks like this:

plot(1:2, main = "šč")
## Warning: conversion failure on 'šč' in 'mbcsToSbcs': dot substituted for
## 
## Warning: conversion failure on 'šč' in 'mbcsToSbcs': dot substituted for
## 
## Warning: conversion failure on 'šč' in 'mbcsToSbcs': dot substituted for
## 
## Warning: conversion failure on 'šč' in 'mbcsToSbcs': dot substituted for
## <8d>
**Plot with correct characters despite the warnings.**

Question:

What causes the problem and how to solve it? How can I at least get rid of the warnings which do show in the resulting file?

Hopeless note:

I have been searching for a solution for the past hour or two, found many similar cases and tried many different potential solutions (many related to PDF output, which is cocked up the same way if I use just Sweave), and now I am literally hopeless.

Edit on 9 November 2012:

The solution using Encoding() suggested by @metasequoia does work, but considering the need to print the code as well, preferably without that function, I prefer the solution provided by @nograpes using the function pdf.options().

It is interesting, though, that while

<!--begin.rcode
pdf.options(encoding='ISOLatin2.enc')
plot(cars, main="Ťažký")
end.rcode-->

produces the same warnings,

<!--begin.rcode
pdf.options(encoding='ISOLatin2.enc')
end.rcode-->

<!--begin.rcode
plot(cars, main="Ťažký")
end.rcode-->

works as expected. Why is that? I thought that chronology is all that matters when running commands in R.

So, the definite solution for my purposes is to put

<!--begin.rcode echo="FALSE"
pdf.options(encoding='ISOLatin2.enc')
end.rcode-->

in the beginning of each of my codes.

share|improve this question
    
Probably not wat you are looking for but what about wrapping the plot call in suppressWarnings –  Romain Francois Nov 8 '12 at 14:40
    
Without a reproducible example, I wasn't able to test solutions. However you may consider declaring your encodings with Encoding() –  metasequoia Nov 8 '12 at 17:08
    
@RomainFrancois Thank you for the suggestion. It is useful when I do not have to print out the code, however the encapsulation is also visible if I do. Is there a way to suppress warnings globally? –  Harold Cavendish Nov 8 '12 at 20:23
    
I was able to reproduce this problem in Ubuntu. I get a different error in Windows, but similar. Edit your question and give examples of input file (test.Rhtml) like: <!--begin.rcode plot(1:2, main = "šč") end.rcode--> and a command like: library(knitr);knit('test.Rhtml') and an example of the output including: <div class="warning"><pre class="knitr r">## Warning: conversion failure on 'šč' in 'mbcsToSbcs': dot substituted for ## <c5> –  nograpes Nov 8 '12 at 20:44
1  
This error is related to a problem in the pdf device, I believe. You can quickly reproduce the error with pdf();plot(1:2,main="šč");dev.off() –  nograpes Nov 8 '12 at 22:11
show 3 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The answer from @metasequoia works, but I wanted to add a few points. If you set the PDF options to a different encoding you won't need to wrap all your output text in Encoding. Run this before clicking Knit HTML:

pdf.options(encoding='ISOLatin2.enc')

Ripley talks about encoding issues, especially as the relate to PDFs, in a post here, and it may be of interest. Notably, this error will not occur in the same way on Windows, because encoding is handled in a completely different way.

A different encoding file may be needed for other languages, but this seems to work for Slovak.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is probably the best solution I can use at least for now. Are there any plans to fix the issues in question? For example so that pdf() supports UTF-8. –  Harold Cavendish Nov 9 '12 at 15:38
    
@HarroldCavendish Check out the post I mentioned in the answer; Ripley mentions that pdf() doesn't support UTF-8 because the underlying graphical language doesn't support UTF-8. –  nograpes Nov 11 '12 at 18:36
    
I have read it. Is it possible to upgrade the underlying graphical language, then? Is there even any ongoing development in this area? Excuse my inexperience regarding this topic. –  Harold Cavendish Nov 11 '12 at 18:58
    
@HarroldCavendish I think what he means is that PDFs themselves don't support UTF-8. So we have to work around Adobe's choice. –  nograpes Nov 12 '12 at 0:14
add comment

Just to explain the solution you found:

<!--begin.rcode
pdf.options(encoding='ISOLatin2.enc')
end.rcode-->

<!--begin.rcode
plot(cars, main="Ťažký")
end.rcode-->

This works whereas it does not work when you put the two lines in the same chunk because for each code chunk, knitr opens a new graphical device to record plots (by default it is a PDF device). It is too late to set pdf.options() because the device has been opened with the default encoding when you put pdf.options() and plot() in the same chunk.

In the working solution, when the PDF device opens for the second chunk, it inherits the encoding from the setting in the previous chunk; that is how it produces the characters correctly.

If you do not want to set this encoding option in each of your Rhtml file, you can put it in ~/.Rprofile so it affects all your PDF devices. Or you define your own function to knit Rhtml files, e.g.

knit2 = function(...) {
   pdf.options(encoding='ISOLatin2.enc')
   knitr::knit(...)
}

Then knit2('yourfile.Rhtml').

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. What I meant was to run pdf.options(encoding='ISOLatin2.enc') in your R Session, not include it in the .Rhtml file. I think this is essentially the same as putting it in your ~/.Rprofile. –  nograpes Nov 9 '12 at 17:01
    
Also, I was wondering if it might make sense to have knitr catch these warnings and suggest a solution. You could still output the warning, but add a little message suggesting "You might want to try pdf.options(encoding='x')". –  nograpes Nov 9 '12 at 17:03
    
It sounds good to suggest pdf.options() automatically, but it is hard to determine x here (encoding is a hard issue for me). I think what I can do is to make this an FAQ. –  Yihui Nov 9 '12 at 17:17
    
Hm, you might be able to just point people to the grDevices/inst/enc/ directory and tell them to find the correct encoding file. –  nograpes Nov 9 '12 at 18:47
    
Yes, I can give a list of possible encodings as you suggested. I mean I'm not sure which encoding would be the correct one to use. Thanks! –  Yihui Nov 9 '12 at 18:53
add comment

Using @nograpes reproducible approximation of an example (R 2.15.1 on Mac OSX):

pdf()
plot(1:2,main="šč")
dev.off()

I was able to replicate the OP's error code. Wrapping "šč" with Encoding() eliminated the warning messages.

pdf()
plot(1:2,main=Encoding("šč"))
dev.off()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, this works as well, however it is not as convenient as @nograpes solution. –  Harold Cavendish Nov 9 '12 at 15:39
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