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If I create a function which returns an boolean value, I can't tell the difference between the following two ways:

Way 1:

public boolean isRight(){
      if(CONDITION){
          return true;
      }else{
          return false;
      }

}

way 2:

public boolean isRight(){
      if(CONDITION){
          return true;
      }
      return false;
}

Can I say the above two ways of creating my function which returns an boolean value are equal/identical? Are there any differences logically?

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Yes, these are the same –  david99world Nov 6 '12 at 13:28
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6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

sure. they are semantically equal.

even better, however:

public boolean isRight(){
      return CONDITION;
}
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4  
+1 for code optimization :-) –  home Nov 6 '12 at 13:28
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Neither one is more efficient than the other. The compiler can easily see that the two are identical, and in fact Suns/Oracles javac produces identical bytecode for the two methods.

Here is an IfTest class:

lass IfTest {

public boolean eq1(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;

    if (obj == null)
        return false;

    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;

    return true;
}


public boolean eq2(Object obj) {

    if (this == obj)
        return true;

    else if (obj == null)
        return false;

    else if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;

    return true;
}

}

I compiled it with javac and the disassembly is as follows:

public boolean eq1(java.lang.Object);
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   aload_1
   2:   if_acmpne   7
   5:   iconst_1
   6:   ireturn
   7:   aload_1
   8:   ifnonnull   13
   11:  iconst_0
   12:  ireturn
   13:  aload_0
   14:  invokevirtual   #2; //Method Object.getClass:()Ljava/lang/Class;
   17:  aload_1
   18:  invokevirtual   #2; //Method Object.getClass:()Ljava/lang/Class;
   21:  if_acmpeq   26
   24:  iconst_0
   25:  ireturn
   26:  iconst_1
   27:  ireturn

and

public boolean eq2(java.lang.Object);
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   aload_1
   2:   if_acmpne   7
   5:   iconst_1
   6:   ireturn
   7:   aload_1
   8:   ifnonnull   13
   11:  iconst_0
   12:  ireturn
   13:  aload_0
   14:  invokevirtual   #2; //Method Object.getClass:()Ljava/lang/Class;
   17:  aload_1
   18:  invokevirtual   #2; //Method Object.getClass:()Ljava/lang/Class;
   21:  if_acmpeq   26
   24:  iconst_0
   25:  ireturn
   26:  iconst_1
   27:  ireturn

That is, I would recommend using the first version (without the else). Some people may argue that it's cleaner with the else parts, but I would argue the opposite. Including the else indicates that the programmer didn't realize that it was unnecessary.

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Yes, they are identical. This is because after the first return statement, CONDITION is guaranteed to be false.

Although this is actually a useless statement. Just use CONDITION instead of isRight(), because they are also always equivalent.

So, all of these are equivalent:

public boolean isRight() {
    if (CONDITION) { return true; }
    else { return false; }
}

and

public boolean isRight() {
    if (CONDITION) { return true; }
    return false;
}

and

public boolean isRight() {
    return CONDITION;
}

and

CONDITION

They are... the same. isRight() just returns CONDITION, so you should just use CONDITION in place of isRight().

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The CONDITION can depend on some state in the class and therefor it is likely that isRight() cannot be changed to CONDITION. –  maba Nov 6 '12 at 13:39
    
If isRight() returns CONDITION then they are the same. Compare the last two examples. –  Doorknob Nov 6 '12 at 13:41
    
if (myObject.isRight()) { ... } can probably not be replaced with if (CONDITION) { ... }. That's what I am saying. CONDITION is probably just a pseudo-code placeholder. –  maba Nov 6 '12 at 13:43
    
If CONDITION is a complex condition, than it is preferable to use a method to hide that and give it a useful name; it usually also makes it easier to test in separation, and it prevents errors if CONDITION occurs in more than one place (but by accident with minor variations). –  Mark Rotteveel Nov 6 '12 at 16:06
    
I was assuming that CONDITION was a variable... and if it's not, just make one! –  Doorknob Nov 6 '12 at 23:11
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Yes. They are exactly the same.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Yaroslav Nov 6 '12 at 13:49
1  
In my opinion it is a valid answer for the question above. –  Michal Klouda Nov 6 '12 at 13:52
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the above answers are completely identical :)

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Yaroslav Nov 6 '12 at 13:49
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They are absolutely identical, but the second one is better to me, as you can quickly identify the default value returned. Some will say the first snippet is more readable, but it's as you prefer.

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