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I have a numpy matrix and would like to concatenate all of the rows together so I end up with one long array.

#example

input:
[[1 2 3]
 [4 5 6}
 [7 8 9]]

output:
[[1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]]

The way I am doing it now doe not seem pythonic. I'm sure there is a better way.

combined_x = x[0] 
for index, row in enumerate(x):
    if index!= 0:
        combined_x = np.concatenate((combined_x,x[index]),axis=1)

Thank you for the help.

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@senderle -- ravel was my first instinct too. Post as an answer and I'll happily upvote. –  mgilson Nov 6 '12 at 14:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would suggest the ravel or flatten method of ndarray.

>>> a = numpy.arange(9).reshape(3, 3)
>>> a.ravel()
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8])

ravel is faster than concatenate and flatten because it doesn't return a copy unless it has to:

>>> a.ravel()[5] = 99
>>> a
array([[ 0,  1,  2],
       [ 3,  4, 99],
       [ 6,  7,  8]])
>>> a.flatten()[5] = 77
>>> a
array([[ 0,  1,  2],
       [ 3,  4, 99],
       [ 6,  7,  8]])

But if you need a copy to avoid the memory sharing illustrated above, you're better off using flatten than concatenate, as you can see from these timings:

>>> %timeit a.ravel()
1000000 loops, best of 3: 468 ns per loop
>>> %timeit a.flatten()
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.42 us per loop
>>> %timeit numpy.concatenate(a)
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.26 us per loop

Note also that you can achieve the exact result that your output illustrates (a one-row 2-d array) with reshape (thanks Pierre GM!):

>>> a = numpy.arange(9).reshape(3, 3)
>>> a.reshape(1, -1)
array([[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]])
>>> %timeit a.reshape(1, -1)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 736 ns per loop
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice analysis, you learn something new every day. –  Maehler Nov 6 '12 at 14:24
1  
Note that ravel or flatten will transform your 2D array to a 1D array --- ie, switching from a (N,M) to a (N*M,) shape. The OP may want to add a .reshape(1,-1) to force the output to a 2D array (1 row, many columns). –  Pierre GM Nov 6 '12 at 14:30
    
Of course, if you want to just transform your 2D array into a 1D one, the faster is your_array.shape = -1... –  Pierre GM Nov 6 '12 at 14:32
    
@PierreGM, thanks for pointing out the difference in output. Regarding your_array.shape -- I did some more informal timings that agree that your_array.shape = (-1,) is a bit faster than your_array.reshape((-1,)) -- probably because the latter creates a new view. But somewhat surprisingly, your_array.shape = -1 is twice as slow as your_array.shape = (-1,). –  senderle Nov 6 '12 at 14:57
    
The timing difference is a bit surprising. Using -1 or (-1,) is a shortcut anyway, we should probably use your_array.size or (your_array.size,) to skip a test... –  Pierre GM Nov 6 '12 at 16:28

You could use the numpy concatenate function:

>>> ar = np.array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]])
>>> np.concatenate(ar)
array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])

You could also try flatten:

>>> ar.flatten()
array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
share|improve this answer
    
Seems exactly what the user wants. –  nightcracker Nov 6 '12 at 14:15
    
Perfect! thank you –  user1764386 Nov 6 '12 at 14:16

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