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I have a table with the following fields:

object_id
attr_id
string_value

The object_id refers to an object in another table, as does the attribute id (they are both foreign keys).

So for example I have rows like this:

22, 14, blah
22, 30, argh
22, 31, moo
44, 30, argh
44, 31, kaw

As you can see object 44, does not have attribute 14 set with a value.

What I want to do is select all objects which do not have attribute 14 defined.

Does anyone have any idea how to do this?

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You've not specified a SQL flavour/version, but your where clause should be something like... ... where attr14 is null ... –  hd1 Nov 6 '12 at 14:16
    
This will not work because attr14 is not a column, the column is attr_id, so you have to a get little more involved than this –  Mark Sherretta Nov 6 '12 at 14:19
    
Do you want to select just object_id or do you want to join columns from the object table (or whatever the table is in which object_id is the primary key)? If you want to join columns please provide the object table schema. –  pseudocoder Nov 6 '12 at 14:27

4 Answers 4

You can use NOT IN in a WHERE clause:

select *
from yourtable t1
where object_id not in (select object_id
                        from yourtable t2
                        where attr_id in (14))

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

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Assuming you have 3 tables for this, and that you don't know what attr_id has been missing,

SELECT c.object_id
FROM 
    (
        SELECT  a.object_id, b.attr_id
        FROM    Table1 a CROSS JOIN Table2 b
    ) c LEFT JOIN tableName d
          ON c.object_id = d.object_id AND
              c.attr_id = d.attr_id
WHERE d.string_value IS NULL

but if you want to return all columns,

SELECT e.*
FROM TableName e
      INNER JOIN
(
  SELECT c.object_id
  FROM 
      (
          SELECT  a.object_id, b.attr_id
          FROM    Table1 a CROSS JOIN Table2 b
      ) c LEFT JOIN tableName d
            ON c.object_id = d.object_id AND
                c.attr_id = d.attr_id
  WHERE d.string_value IS NULL
) f ON e.object_id = f.object_id
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1  
This query is nearly unreadable. Why so complicated? –  pseudocoder Nov 6 '12 at 14:33
    
@pseudocoder why unreadable? do you know what is the value of attr_id has been missing? This is only an assumption, and one of it is that the query doesn't know what is the missing value of attr_id for each object_id. –  John Woo Nov 6 '12 at 14:35
    
I think you misunderstood the question, either that or I don't understand your genius. Either way, bluefeet offers a simpler approach in my opinion. –  pseudocoder Nov 6 '12 at 14:44
    
@pseudocoder i respect your opinion, anyway we have different point of view. I was thinking that the OP doesn't know what object_id that lacks attr_id. Even if he mentioned about 14 but I guess it was just an example. Anyway it's up to the OP. –  John Woo Nov 6 '12 at 14:51
select m.*
from MyTable m
where not exists (select 1 from MyTable m2 where m2.object_id = m.object_id and m2.attr_id = 14)

You can also do it with a self join, e.g.:

select m1.*
from MyTable m1
inner join MyTable m2 on m1.object_id = m2.object_id and m2.attr_id = 14
where m2.object_id is null
share|improve this answer

I don't quite get what you mean, but for Booleans in SQL:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE attr_id <> '14'

Instead of = which means "equal" you use <> or != which both mean "different" (The first is a bit better supported, but it's almost insignificant);

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