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How to change function argument name. For example using substitute I can change function argument value or function name:

substitute(quote(F(x= A)), list(A= quote(B), F= quote(G)))
## result
quote(G(x = B))

but this doesn't work:

substitute(quote(F(x= A)), list(x= quote(y)))
## result
quote(F(x = A))

# EDIT (@Joran here is real example, maybe not so real but very close to what I am doing)

#

library("multcomp")
data("mtcars")

mtcars$gear <- factor(mtcars$gear)
mtcars$cyl <- factor(mtcars$cyl)
xv <- c("gear","cyl")

for(v in xv){
 fo <- as.formula(paste("mpg",v,sep="~"))
 fit <- lm(fo,data=mtcars)
 print(eval(substitute(summary(glht(fit,linfct= mcp(vn="Dunnett"))),list(vn=v))))
}
share|improve this question
3  
I wouldn't do either. What is it you really want to do? Typically in R, you might do foo<- 'G'; bar<-'x' ; do.call(foo,bar) to select a function and its arguments based on string objects. –  Carl Witthoft Nov 6 '12 at 14:52
3  
What are you really trying to do? –  joran Nov 6 '12 at 15:00
1  
@ What Carl & Joran said ("What is it you really want to do?!"). I'd change the arguments via formals() myself... –  Gavin Simpson Nov 6 '12 at 15:01
    
@Carl Witthoft can you write your answer –  Wojciech Sobala Nov 6 '12 at 16:16
2  
I thought you might be doing something with multcomp. See Hadley's or my answer to this question, which is essentially identical to your own. –  Josh O'Brien Nov 6 '12 at 16:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Taking your example of something similar to the actual problem, why not do this:

library("multcomp")
data("mtcars")

mtcars$gear <- factor(mtcars$gear)
mtcars$cyl <- factor(mtcars$cyl)
xv <- c("gear","cyl")

ll <- list("Dunnett")
for(v in xv){
  fo <- as.formula(paste("mpg",v,sep="~"))
  fit <- lm(fo,data=mtcars)
  names(ll) <- v
  print(summary(glht(fit, linfct = do.call(mcp, ll))))
}

Which gives:

     Simultaneous Tests for General Linear Hypotheses

Multiple Comparisons of Means: Dunnett Contrasts


Fit: lm(formula = fo, data = mtcars)

Linear Hypotheses:
           Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
4 - 3 == 0    8.427      1.823   4.621 0.000144 ***
5 - 3 == 0    5.273      2.431   2.169 0.072493 .  
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1 
(Adjusted p values reported -- single-step method)


     Simultaneous Tests for General Linear Hypotheses

Multiple Comparisons of Means: Dunnett Contrasts


Fit: lm(formula = fo, data = mtcars)

Linear Hypotheses:
           Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
6 - 4 == 0   -6.921      1.558  -4.441 0.000235 ***
8 - 4 == 0  -11.564      1.299  -8.905 1.71e-09 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1 
(Adjusted p values reported -- single-step method)

The trick here is to note that the first argument to mcp is ... which usually means we can pass in a list of the form list(tag = value). We can't specify tag as v here, so just create the list ll with a single element "Dunnett" and then change the names attribute of this list in the loop to be v. Then use do.call() to arrange to call mcp() with this argument list.

And for completeness, as @Josh metions in a comment above, from this answer from @Hadley the list can be more succinctly stated using the setNames() function:

for(v in xv){
  fo <- as.formula(paste("mpg",v,sep="~"))
  fit <- lm(fo,data=mtcars)
  print(summary(glht(fit, linfct = do.call(mcp, setNames(list("Dunnett"), v)))))
}
share|improve this answer
    
It can be shortened to: print(summary(glht(fit, linfct= setNames(eval(mcp(vn= "Dunnett")),v)))). –  Wojciech Sobala Nov 6 '12 at 20:35

Taking your question title and first line at face value why not copy the function and/or use formals() depending on whether the function name or the arguments need to change?

For the first one:

F <- function(x = A) {}
G <- F
formals(G) <- alist(x = B)

> args(G)
function (x = B) 
NULL

For the second one

F <- function(x = A) {}
formals(F) <- alist(y = A)

> args(F)
function (y = A) 
NULL
share|improve this answer

If you must dynamically alter the name of the supplied arguments, you could do something like this:

cl <- quote(F(x = a))
names(cl)[names(cl) == "x"] <- "y"
cl
# F(y = a)
share|improve this answer

After seeing the example of what you're really doing, you could also use parse and sprintf

 print(eval(parse(text=sprintf("summary(glht(fit,linfct= mcp(%s='Dunnett')))",
   v))))
share|improve this answer
1  
I try to heed the advice of Thomas Lumley in this regard. require("fortunes"); fortune(106). –  Gavin Simpson Nov 6 '12 at 16:33
    
@GavinSimpson, but the question wasn't mine! (+1 to both your answers) –  BenBarnes Nov 6 '12 at 16:36
1  
/me checks own code for parse... –  BenBarnes Nov 6 '12 at 16:45

As requested, comment moved to an answer:

I wouldn't do either. What is it you really want to do? Typically in R, you might do foo<- 'G'; bar<-'x' ; do.call(foo,bar) to select a function and its arguments based on string objects.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for suggesting do.call –  Wojciech Sobala Nov 6 '12 at 20:41

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