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I tried to solve this problem Problem Description It seems correct idea is to check if given graphs have cycles (whether is a tree). However, my code couldn't pass Test 7, (Always Time Limit Exceeded), any idea how to make this faster? I used DFS. Many thanks Yes, finally got accepted. The problem is dfs on each vertex, which is unnecessary. the dfs function should be like this.

function dfs(idx: integer; id: integer): boolean;
begin
  if (visited[idx] = id) then
  begin
    Result := false;
    Exit;
  end;
  if (tree[idx] <> 0) then
  begin
    visited[idx] := id;
    Result := dfs(tree[idx], id);
    Exit;
  end;
  Result := true;
end;



program Project2;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

var
  i, m, j, n, k: integer;
  tree: array [1 .. 25001] of integer;
  visited: array [1 .. 25001] of boolean;

function dfs(idx: integer): boolean;
label
  fin;
var
  buf: array[1 .. 25001] of integer;
  i, cnt: integer;
begin
  cnt := 1;
  while (true) do
  begin
    if (visited[idx]) then
    begin
      Result := false;
      goto fin;
    end;
    if (tree[idx] <> 0) then
    begin
      visited[idx] := true;
      buf[cnt] := idx;
      Inc(cnt);
      idx := tree[idx];
    end
    else
    begin
      break;
    end;
  end;
  Result := true;
fin:
  for i := 1 to cnt - 1 do
  begin
    visited[buf[i]] := false;
  end;
end;

function chk(n: integer): boolean;
var
  i: integer;
begin
  for i := 1 to n do
  begin
    if (tree[i] = 0) then continue;
    if (visited[i]) then continue;
    if (dfs(i) = false) then
    begin
      Result := false;
      Exit;
    end;
  end;
  Result := true;
end;

begin
  Readln(m);
  for i := 1 to m do
  begin
    Readln(n);
    k := 0;
    for j := 1 to n do
    begin
      Read(tree[j]);
      if (tree[j] = 0) then
      begin
        Inc(k);
      end;
    end;
    if (k <> 1) then
    begin
      Writeln('NO');
    end
    else
    if (chk(n)) then
    begin
      Writeln('YES');
    end
    else
    begin
      Writeln('NO');
    end;
    Readln;
  end;
  //Readln;
end.
share|improve this question
1  
a general rule of thumb is that recursion is slower then iterative counterparts. Try using bfs if possible? –  FUD Nov 6 '12 at 15:10
    
well, i agree. but i have removed 'recursion' by using a buffer array to unmark the visited-array. Besides,, i think DFS finds a cycle faster.... –  DoctorLai Nov 6 '12 at 15:12
    
Surely you could use a known property of trees, say something about number of edges versus number of vertices to avoid most of this work? You would need to do so per connected component. –  A. Webb Nov 6 '12 at 15:33
1  
@FUD: The claim is wrong. I benchmarked (and statistically proved) it in this thread for iterative/recursive quick sort. You need to have a very optimized implementation of a stack (for the specific need) in order for that claim to be true. –  amit Nov 6 '12 at 16:07
1  
A graph is a tree if and only if it (1) is connected and (2) has no cycles. These (1) and (2) are equivalent to the (1) and (2) given by @amit. –  A. Webb Nov 6 '12 at 16:34
show 5 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I know next to nothing about Pascal, so I could be misinterpreting what you are doing, but I think the main culprit is at fin where you unmark visited vertices. This forces you into doing a DFS from each vertex, whereas you only need to do one per component.

In the case where there is more than one connected component the movement will either halt

  • because a vertex points to a vertex already marked, in which case we just halt due to a cycle having been found
  • because the vertex points to no one (but itself), in which case we need to find the next unmarked vertex and start another DFS again from there

You need not worry about bookkeeping for backtracking as each vertex at most points to one other vertex in this problem. There is also no need to worry about which DFS did which marking, as each will only work within its connected component anyway.

In the case where a vertex that points to itself is encountered first, it should not be marked yet, but skipped over.

Alternate Solution Using Set Union and Vertex/Edge Count

Since a tree has the property that the number of edges is one less than the number of vertices, there is another way to think about the problem -- determine (1) the connected components and (2) compare the edge and vertex count in each component.

In many languages you have a Set data structure with near-constant time Union/Find methods readily available. In this case the solution is easy and fast - near-linear in the number of edges.

Create an Set for each vertex representing its connected component. Then process your edge list. For each edge, Union the Sets represented by the two vertices. As you go, keep track of the number of vertices in each Set and the number edges. Same example:

Initial Sets

Vertex         1  2  3  4  5
Belongs to     S1 S2 S3 S4 S5

Set            S1 S2 S3 S4 S5
Has # vertices 1  1  1  1  1
And # edges    0  0  0  0  0

Process edge from 1 to 2

Vertex         1  2  3  4  5
Belongs to     S1 S1 S3 S4 S5

Set            S1 S3 S4 S5
Has # vertices 2  1  1  1
And # edges    1  0  0  0

Process edge from 2 to 3

Vertex         1  2  3  4  5
Belongs to     S1 S1 S1 S4 S5


Set            S1 S4 S5
Has # vertices 3  1  1
And # edges    2  0  0

Process edge from 3 to 4

Vertex         1  2  3  4  5
Belongs to     S1 S1 S1 S1 S5

Set            S1 S5
Has # vertices 4  1
And # edges    3  0

Process edge from 4 to 1

Vertex         1  2  3  4  5
Belongs to     S1 S1 S1 S1 S5

Set            S1 S5
Has # vertices 4  1
And # edges    4  0

And we can stop here because S1 at this point violates the vertex versus edge count of trees. There is a cycle in S1. It does not matter if vertex 5 points to itself or to someone else.

For posterity, here is an implementation in . It's been a while, so forgive the sloppiness. It is not the fastest, but it does pass all tests within the time limit. The disjoint set coding is straight from Wikipedia's pseudocode.

#include <stdio.h>

struct ds_node
{
    struct ds_node *parent;
    int rank;
};

struct ds_node v[25001];

void ds_makeSet(struct ds_node *x)
{
    x->parent = x;
    x->rank = 0;
}

struct ds_node* ds_find(struct ds_node *x)
{
    if (x->parent != x) x->parent = ds_find(x->parent);
    return x->parent;
}

int ds_union(struct ds_node *x, struct ds_node *y)
{
    struct ds_node * xRoot;
    struct ds_node * yRoot;

    xRoot = ds_find(x);
    yRoot = ds_find(y);

    if (xRoot == yRoot) return 0;

    if (xRoot->rank < yRoot->rank) 
    {
        xRoot->parent = yRoot;
    }
    else if (xRoot->rank > yRoot->rank) 
    {
        yRoot->parent = xRoot;
    }
    else 
    {
        yRoot->parent = xRoot;
        xRoot->rank++;
    }
    return 1;
}

int test(int n)
{
    int i, e, z = 0;

    for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
    {
        ds_makeSet(&v[i]);
    }
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
    {
        scanf("%d",&e);
        if (e)
        {
            if ( !ds_union(&v[i],&v[e]) ) 
            {
                for(i++;i<=n;i++) scanf("%d",&e);
                return 0;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            z++;
        }
    }
    return (z == 1);
}
int main()
{
    int runs; int n;

    scanf("%d", &runs);
    while(runs--)
    {
        scanf("%d", &n); 
        getc(stdin);

        test(n) ? puts("YES") : puts("NO");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interresting solution, but could you explain how would that be faster than a dfs ? The way i see it, your solution is equivalent to dfs with earrly exit –  GreyGeek Nov 6 '12 at 17:43
    
@GreyGeek Yes, I do believe you are correct. I think I'll edit my answer to describe this as just another way of thinking about the problem. If we knew the graph was connected, comparing vertex and edge counts could certainly be faster than cycle detection via DFS. But, as it is, we have to determine connectivity, which DFS does at the same time. –  A. Webb Nov 6 '12 at 18:09
    
However, in this particular problem, the graphs may not be connected... –  DoctorLai Nov 6 '12 at 20:30
1  
@DoctorLai Yep, so a DFS should just as fast, faster indeed due to lower overhead. See the beginning of my answer for my attempt to diagnose what might be slowing down your DFS code. –  A. Webb Nov 6 '12 at 20:39
    
thanks.. yep, you are right.. it is unnecessary to dfs on each vertex. –  DoctorLai Nov 7 '12 at 0:16
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