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My question

What JavaScript code will tell me where the viewport of the browser is located relative to the screen?

Context

My web application includes an applet that allows taking a snapshot via java.awt.Robot (the applet's jar is of course signed and is privileged to perform this).

The problem is that Robot's createScreenCapture works with rectangles relative to the entire screen, whereas I want to capture a rectangle relative to the viewport.

A browser can obviously be anywhere on the screen, but even if it is maximized (and therefore begins at the top left of the screen, i.e. {0,0}) I still don't know how much the content is pushed down because of the window header or some toolbars.

My research so far

It seems only IE gives the viewport position through window.screenTop/Left.

Chrome supports these, but they hold the browser position.

FF doesn't support these, instead it has screenX/Y, but like Chrome they hold the browser position.

Making sure we all use the same terminology

Screen - AKA the desktop. for example I have a WSXGA+ (1680x1050) display. I use Windows and my taskbar is always shown at the bottom so it consumes about 50 pixels vertically.

Browser - a window that may or may not have various toolbars: address and/or bookmarks bar at the top, status/add-on bars at the bottom, etc.

Viewport - where a URL is actually being rendered.

share|improve this question
    
Very clearly expressed question, with useful background to avoid the X-Y question problem. – Quentin Nov 6 '12 at 15:23
    
+1 for a perfectly clear and well-structured question. a lot of people on SE should take a leaf ot of targumon's book. – oezi Nov 6 '12 at 15:34
    
Sorry mate, I was in a hurry and I didn't pay attention to the full question... – Ofear Nov 6 '12 at 15:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your applet knows its location via getLocationOnScreen()

Here is a Java applet that prints the screen location of the mouse cursor while you are inside of it:

ScreenTest.java:

import java.awt.Point;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.applet.Applet;
import java.awt.event.MouseMotionListener;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
public class ScreenTest extends Applet implements MouseMotionListener
{
    public ScreenTest()
    {
        this.addMouseMotionListener(this);
    }
    public void mouseDragged(MouseEvent e)
    {
    }
    public void mouseMoved(MouseEvent e)
    {
        Graphics g = getGraphics();
        Point loc=getLocationOnScreen();

        String s=(loc.getX()+e.getX())+":"+(loc.getY()+e.getY());
        g.clearRect(0,0,1000,100);
        g.drawString(s, 10, 10);
    }
}

screentest.html:

<html>
    <head></head>
    <body>
        <applet code="ScreenTest.class" name="screenTest" height=100 width=1000></applet>
    </body>
</html>

Here's a simpler example called by javascript. The applet is 1px by 1px in the upper left corner of the page.

ScreenTest2.java:

import java.awt.Point;
import java.applet.Applet;
public class ScreenTest2 extends Applet
{
    public String test(int x, int y)
    {
        Point loc=getLocationOnScreen();
        return (loc.getX()+x)+":"+(loc.getY()+y);
    }
}

screentest2.html:

<html>
    <head></head>
    <body onclick="buttonClick(event);" style="margin:0; border:0; height:800px">
        <applet code="ScreenTest2.class" name="screenTest2" height=1 width=1></applet>
    </body>
    <script>
        function buttonClick(evt)
        {
            alert(screenTest2.test(evt.clientX,evt.clientY));
        }
    </script>
</html>
share|improve this answer
1  
it's not javascript.... – CapelliC Nov 8 '12 at 1:40
    
@chac The way I understand the question, the coordinates are needed for a call to java.awt.Robot from within the applet, so this should be a workable solution. – Jon Hulka Nov 8 '12 at 1:44
    
you're right!! please excuse my useless comment...and i can stop searching the old code... – CapelliC Nov 8 '12 at 1:52
    
@JonHulka please correct me if I'm wrong, but getLocationOnScreen() works only when the mouse is over the applet. This applet is 1*1px with the sole purpose of taking a screencap of the REST of the page. The page contains components in iframes with various technologies - Flex/Flash, plain HTML, 'real' Applet, Silverlight, etc. - and Robot is the only tool we've found which hooks on the display, thus reliably perform a true WYSIWYG screencap. – targumon Nov 8 '12 at 11:56
    
You can see a video of the product here: youtube.com/watch?v=-TAySeyF4bU skip to 5:00 and see how a user creates a new dashboard page. at 5:55 they hit the 'save' button, and at that moment we take a screenshot, so we have a thumbnail for this page. – targumon Nov 8 '12 at 11:57

Jon Hulka's answer totally earned him his credit - works perfect for me!

If someone else gets here and need a solution that doesn't use applets (my question asked for JavaScript code), they can try the (compromising*) solution below.

*= It assumes browsers don't have too much stuff at the bottom of their windows.

function cacheElemImage(element) {
    var x, y, pos = findPosition(element);
    // screenTop/Left supported on all except FF. screenX/Y supported on all except IE.
    // In addition IE returns viewport top/left while FF & Chrome return browser window top/left.
    // Opera & Safari yet to be tested.
    if (isIE()) {
        x = window.screenLeft;
        y = window.screenTop;
    } else {
        var borderWidth = (window.outerWidth - window.innerWidth) / 2;
        x = window.screenX + borderWidth;
        y = window.screenY + window.outerHeight - window.innerHeight - borderWidth;
    }
    x += pos[0]; // adjust for the element position
    y += pos[1];
    var width  = element.offsetWidth;
    var height = element.offsetHeight;
    cacheImage(x, y, width, height); // call the applet with the Robot
}

function findPosition(oElement) {
    if (typeof(oElement.offsetParent) != 'undefined') {
        for (var posX = 0, posY = 0; oElement; oElement = oElement.offsetParent) {
            posX += oElement.offsetLeft;
            posY += oElement.offsetTop;
        }
        return [posX, posY];
    } else {
        return [oElement.x, oElement.y];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for accepting my answer. I think there is still some confusion regarding mouse position. As illustrated by the second example, ScreenTest2.java, the mouse position has nothing to do with getLocationOnScreen(), the returned coordinate is actually the upper-left corner of the Applet, which can be positioned using css to anywhere you want it on the page. In other words, getLocationOnScreen() has no relation to the mouse whereabouts. – Jon Hulka Nov 16 '12 at 3:10
    
I stand corrected! Your solution will soon be checked-in :-) – targumon Nov 19 '12 at 15:42
    
Just what I needed, thanks! Could you expound on your caveat about "bottom of window"? – Joe Coder Feb 21 '13 at 17:36
1  
@JoeCoder , The developer tools I sometimes use (F12 in Chrome, ctrl-shift-K in Firefox, etc.) occupy some real estate at the bottom so the viewport doesn't go all the way down. Actual users are not expected to use these while using the app, so no problem here. However, Internet Explorer may display a 'status bar', which isn't very tall, but might ruin the snapshot a bit. – targumon Feb 22 '13 at 22:48

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