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I want to optimise my table in order to speed up the query result. Currently I'm using MyISAM instead of InnoDB.

The question is, very first postcode is 5 chars long and doesn't start with A letter. All those postcodes start with A letter are 6 or 7 chars long and about in the middle of the table records. Do you think records in my table should be in A-Z order or length of postcode (those with less chars listed on top of the table) is better for optimization?

Or what else do you suggest?

TABLE STRUCTURE:

CREATE TABLE `postcodes` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `postcode` varchar(10) NOT NULL,
  `latitude` decimal(25,20) NOT NULL,
  `longitude` decimal(25,20) NOT NULL,
  `fk_areas_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `unique_postcodes_postcode` (`postcode`) USING HASH
) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=1696089 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

QUERY:

SELECT
                    (@rownum := @rownum + 1) AS No,
                    postcode AS Postcode,
                    latitude AS Latitude,
                    longitude AS Longitude,
                    (
                        (
                            ACOS(SIN((SELECT latitude FROM postcodes WHERE postcode = $postcode) * PI() / 180) * SIN(latitude * PI() / 180) +
                            COS((SELECT latitude FROM postcodes WHERE postcode = $postcode) * PI() / 180) * COS(latitude * PI() / 180) *
                            COS(((SELECT longitude FROM postcodes WHERE postcode = $postcode) - longitude) * PI() / 180)) * 180 / PI()
                        ) * 60 * 1.1515
                    ) AS Distance
                FROM postcodes, (SELECT @rownum := 0) AS No
                HAVING Distance <= 0.5 /*miles*/
                ORDER BY Distance ASC
share|improve this question
    
ummm ... what are you doing with the trig functions? –  amphibient Nov 6 '12 at 16:27
    
What do you mean? –  Mad Max Nov 6 '12 at 16:31
    
what is the purpose of using SIN and COS? why are you using them? –  amphibient Nov 6 '12 at 16:40
    
Calculating the distance for given postcode. I need it anyway. –  Mad Max Nov 6 '12 at 16:42
    
By distance for a given postcode is that between two arbitrary post codes? –  Woot4Moo Nov 6 '12 at 17:00
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The order of the records is probably not influential. You can optimize something by simplifying the query, another little something by precalculating values, and some more by storing the data with the minimum required precision.

I have been running some tests with about 10,000 randomly generated postcodes, and I'm seeing a (roughly) 25% performance increase with all of the above and this index:

CREATE INDEX postcodes_ndx ON postcodes(postcode, latitude, longitude);

Your results will depend on what other data is present in each row, as well as platform and other parameters.

Consider also the possibility of leveraging MySQL's spatial extensions. Otherwise, you might try storing an off-the-cuff UTM position for each postcode (as long as you're not covering an area as wide as Russia), and restricting the first table to those values within a square three miles on a side, centered on $postcode. This will immediately reduce the retrieved rows by a couple of orders of magnitude, proportionately increasing the query speed.

I started with a JOIN instead of the subselects:

SELECT
(@rownum := @rownum + 1) AS No,
A.postcode AS Postcode,
A.latitude AS Latitude,
A.longitude AS Longitude,
ACOS(
        SIN(B.latitude * PI() / 180) * SIN(A.latitude * PI() / 180) +
        COS(B.latitude * PI() / 180) * COS(A.latitude * PI() / 180) *
        COS((B.longitude - A.longitude) * PI() / 180)
) * 180 / PI() * 60 * 1.1515
AS Distance
FROM postcodes AS A,
(SELECT * FROM postcodes WHERE postcode = $postcode) AS B,
(SELECT @rownum := 0) AS No
HAVING Distance <= 0.5 /*miles*/
ORDER BY Distance ASC;

Also, I think you are storing latitude and longitude with way too much precision.

Once you have locations with three digits plus six decimals, that's about an inch precision, and the math formula you're using has an error superior to that.

You might also be able to squeeze some performance by storing latitude and longitude in radiants instead of degrees; that way you save most of the PI()/180 calculations. You can do that with a trigger, and store two extra columns with lat_rad and lng_rad (they need each about three decimals more than lat and lng).

You can also precalculate some of the values, e.g. the arccos you can multiply directly by 3958.57 instead of 180/PI()*60*1.1515.

You can also move some of the trig calculations inside the JOIN:

SELECT A.postcode AS Postcode,    
       A.latitude AS Latitude,
       A.longitude AS Longitude,
      ACOS(
        sinlat * SIN(A.latitude * PI() / 180)
      + coslat * COS(A.latitude * PI() / 180)
      * COS((B.longitude - A.longitude) * PI() / 180)
      ) * 3958.57 AS Distance
FROM postcodes AS A,
(SELECT latitude, longitude,
 COS(latitude*PI()/180) AS coslat,
 SIN(latitude*PI()/180) AS sinlat
 FROM postcodes WHERE postcode = $postcode
) AS B HAVING Distance <= 0.5
ORDER BY Distance ASC;

Finally you can remove the @rownum calculation and add it back in PHP:

$rownum = 1;
while($tuple = SQLFetchTuple($exec))
{
    $tuple['No'] = $rownum++;
    ... same code as before...
}

Trim down the first table

This really would benefit from spatial extensions, but we can force the first group of postcodes to bee within a tenth of a degree from the first.

Of course, unless you're at the Equator, the two distances won't be the same -- you can calculate a latitude and longitude delta corresponding to about two or three miles, to have a safe margin.

SELECT A.postcode AS Postcode,
   A.latitude AS Latitude,
   A.longitude AS Longitude,
   ACOS(
       sinlat * SIN(A.latitude * PI() / 180) +
       coslat * COS(A.latitude * PI() / 180) * COS((B.longitude - A.longitude) * PI() / 180)
   ) * 3958.57 AS Distance
FROM postcodes AS A,
(SELECT latitude, longitude,
  COS(latitude*PI()/180) AS coslat,
  SIN(latitude*PI()/180) AS sinlat
 FROM postcodes WHERE postcode = $postcode) AS B
WHERE
    ABS(A.latitude  - B.latitude ) < 0.1
AND ABS(A.longitude - B.longitude) < 0.1
HAVING Distance <= 0.5

ORDER BY Distance ASC;

share|improve this answer
    
My query takes: 2.4sc, Yours: 1.7sc :) I also changed decimal(25,20) to decimal(8,5) as you mentioned. –  Mad Max Nov 6 '12 at 17:17
    
Thank you....... –  Mad Max Nov 6 '12 at 17:28
    
1.7s is still a lot. How many postcodes were there again? (And how wide an area are we talking about?) –  lserni Nov 6 '12 at 17:41
    
About 1.7 million. Range is about 0.5 miles which returns 428 postcodes for given postcode. –  Mad Max Nov 6 '12 at 17:55
    
Try this -- I'm putting 0.1 just for the lulz, you better tune it somewhat. Let me know -- appending to answer... –  lserni Nov 6 '12 at 17:56
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I would recommend using materialized views that have indexes on them. Anytime you do a function such as COS or SIN the database has to compute that fresh, so your index will be ignored. You should create a materialized view (I think in MySQL they are just views) that precomputes the solution for you. Once that solution has been computed you then index the materialized view and query against that.

Apparently the way to do it in MySQL is as follows:

Create table computed_view  
  --Complex and lengthy sql here  
create index on foo
create index on bar
create index on baz

Then you would do:

select * from computed_view where foo = ? and bar = ?

Or an even simpler solution. Calculate the distance prior to inserting so that way you database is just a data repository (the way it should be treated). If you find yourself doing mathematical calculations in the database you have gone down the wrong path. Offset this to PHP or whatever language you are using and then persist the calculated value.

share|improve this answer
    
In general you're right. In this case, I disagree. Persisting the distances between 1.7M postcodes would require some three thousand billion rows. On the other hand, since the selection is based on distance, offloading it to PHP would mean that we would not have the distance at selection time, and therefore we'd have to retrieve all of those 1.7M rows to churn them in PHP. This too is not easily doable. –  lserni Nov 6 '12 at 18:07
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