Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What all is involved if I wanted to switch from PHP to asp.net? I have basicly no knowledge of asp or other languages besides php and some javascript.

What would be the best place to start learning more?

What is needed to host an asp site?

What is it developed with?

Is there an equivalent to php.net for a resource?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. google asp.net c# tutorial. seriously
  2. download ms VS express edition(free) http://www.microsoft.com/express/vwd/
  3. do a project. nothing like learning on the job
share|improve this answer
add comment

I made the switch from script-based server side languages (Classic ASP and PHP) to .NET a number of years back. If I recall, the hardest part was understanding the tight integration between client-side events and server-side event handling. Once that clicked the rest was just an exercise in learning new syntax (that was actually more like C++ which I learned in college).

share|improve this answer
add comment

I've written PHP web projects for several years and considered myself intermediate with PHP. I recently wrote an application (in PHP) for a company that got noticed by the programming department, and they had me transition to a job programming in C# and .NET.

My first reaction was very standoffish; I learned to program in an anti-Microsoft environment and mindset. The last thing I wanted to do was learn something in .NET.

After several months of forcing myself to learn C# and OOP I have to say it's actually a wonderful thing. At least for developing Windows applications. I'd always wanted to do some desktop applications and this has been a great way to do it.

But so far nothing has involved ASP.net, and now I have a project which requires some web output. I'm struggling with learning ASP, and the fact of the matter is I am tempted to write the web portion of it in PHP. For me, C# makes sense for Windows and OOP, but for quick data-parsing applications on the web, PHP is quick and gets the job done.

I am going to keep working on the ASP thing though, specifically looking at MVC. Another question on SO got me interested in focusing on MVC. I've been perusing books and watching tutorial videos, and so far I am hopelessly confused.

Perhaps it will be something I look back on and am grateful for having made the effort -- like learning C# in the first place. Right now, the ASP approach to web coding seems foreign, despite knowing more about C# and OOP than I did a year ago.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think a good place to start would be to take one of your existing PHP projects, and rewrite it in ASP.Net. That way you wouldn't really be tasked with coming up with something new, and learning a language at the same time. However, don't just try to do a line by line conversion. ASP.Net has a much different programming model than PHP. So you'd be much better off looking at the end product, and trying to produce the same thing, without necessarily producing the same code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I did this switch several times. If you have good grasp of OO and the most common design patterns, you won't have too much of a problem to grasp the dot.net languages.
b.t.w I really REALLY suggest you consider only C#.
Best way to start is take a Wrox book and start learning it. Do not start directly from asp.net, but rather from console applications.
The book will show you how to install a development environment, which is an inseparable thing from the dot.ent env.
If what the book suggests is not the MS express environment, I suggest you use Express. As far as something like php.net, well, MSDN is by far a better tool then php.net and this is from a PHP freak and ex-Zender.

To sum it up, just do the exercises in the book, it will be OK

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.