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Code copy string in C

#include <stdio.h>
char *copyString(char *,char *);
void main()
{
    char *first = (char *)calloc(sizeof(char),10);
    char *second = (char *)calloc(sizeof(char),10);
    printf("Enter first string:\t");
    scanf("%s",first);
    printf("%s",copyString(first,second));
}
char *copyString(char *a,char *b)
{
int i=0;
while(*(a+i)!='\0')
{
*(b+i)=*(a+i);
i++;
}
*(b+i)='\0';
return b;
}

Case 1:


Input : Hello

Output : Hello

Case 2:


Input : Hello World

Output : Hello

So, my question is whether space is considered as newline/null ?? Because, in second case, it shows like this..

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For future reference, its much easer to read sample code that has been properly indented. Your main function is very easy to understand; copyString is horrible. –  simonc Nov 6 '12 at 17:09
    
@simonc sorry for that... :-) –  jWeaver Nov 6 '12 at 17:11
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7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

By default, scanf stops reading the standard input stream when a space character ' ' is encountered. To fix it, you can use a scanset.

scanf("%[^\n]", first);
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why so ?? space is also a character. isn't ?? –  jWeaver Nov 6 '12 at 17:07
    
yes that's how scanf() is defined. It will stop reading after first whitespace –  Aniket Nov 6 '12 at 17:08
    
@Aniket okk... i wasn't aware of this.. –  jWeaver Nov 6 '12 at 17:10
    
[^\n] what does it mean ?? i believe, this is used for checking pattern for new line. But, my question is instead of %s, we have used %[^\n] and it works. how ?? –  jWeaver Nov 6 '12 at 17:33
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scanf() stops reading after the first whitespace by default. Use fgets() or gets()[unsafe]. With regards to why it is this way, you might want to read the POSIX pages here: http://www.unix.com/man-page/POSIX/3posix/scanf/ and ISO C standards here: http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1124.pdf. It has a lengthy description on how scanf() and fscanf()(and all other standard C functions) should work. These are generally followed guidelines on how functions in C library should work.

All compilers strive hard to create POSIX compliant standard-c libraries that work the same across most UNIX'ish platforms.

The standard C functions are actually defined here: http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1124.pdf

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It's because stops reading after whitespace when you input it the string. So you actaully only have "Hello" in your first string, not "Hello world".

Use fgets() to read the whole line.

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As suggested scanf stops at the first whitespace, you could use fgets instead to read the whole line. And when you get that working allocate more space, because "Hello World" is 12 bytes not 10.

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sorry... that was just an example.. my main question was... it is not reading after space character –  jWeaver Nov 6 '12 at 17:08
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Your scanf is scanning just one string for two strings to be scanned you should write:

      scanf("%s %s",first,second);

Similarly for more strings to be scanned you should do like this that is giving as many %s as many strings you want to scan.

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The scanf function here will read input until it encounters whitespace. You will need to implement a readline function.

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use #include and utilize this function strcpy of string.h lib. following is the example:

    strcpy(first, second);

This should run fine.

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