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I have been working to provide text analysis of data. Often analysis included coding of a transcript on paper and then importing the information as numeric codes into R. I want to output a transcript of words with their word number above cut to a certain line width (let's use an arbitrary 80 characters).

A minimal visualization example:

#what we start with:

   person   text word.num
1    greg    The        1
2    greg    dog        2
3    greg   went        3
4    greg     to        4
5    greg    the        5
6    greg   zoo,        6
7    greg    but        7
8    greg    ate        8
9    greg first.        9
10  sally     He       10
11  sally  likes       11
12  sally  water       12
13  sally      a       13
14  sally    bit       14
15  sally   too.       15

#what I'd like:

1   2   3    4  5   6
The dog went to the zoo, 

7   8   9      10 11     
but ate first. He likes   

12    13  14  15
water a   bit too.  

An additional problem arises as the numbers get large in that a larger word number may exceed a short word and the word would need an additional space placed in front of it. I think this would be easy enough to do in the pasting process by determining the max characters (digits) of the largest number and adding that much space after words that are less than this amount.

My thought to tackle this thus far was to:

  1. Create a 1 column matrix for the character vector that each row is a certain max length (strwrap may be useful here)
  2. Add extra spaces after short words as discussed above (nchar and gsub may be useful here)
  3. Determine the the numeric values for an accompanying matrix by using a word count function and then cumsum and seq to make an accompanying matrix of numeric values (actually character) that is also 1 column. This will match row for row with the character (words) matrix.
  4. Now the two matrices need to be alternated row by row (not sure how to do this)
  5. Align the numbers above the words (not sure how to do this but nchar may be useful here)

I'd like to keep this in base tools though I'm sure Hadely's stringR would be useful I want to avoid this dependency.

dput data above:

 dat <- structure(list(person = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L,                           
     1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("greg", "sally"), class = "factor"),             
         text = structure(c(10L, 5L, 14L, 11L, 9L, 15L, 4L, 2L, 6L,                               
         7L, 8L, 13L, 1L, 3L, 12L), .Label = c("a", "ate", "bit",                                 
         "but", "dog", "first.", "He", "likes", "the", "The", "to",                               
         "too.", "water", "went", "zoo,"), class = "factor"), word.num = 1:15), row.names = c(NA, 
     -15L), .Names = c("person", "text", "word.num"), class = "data.frame")  

I couldn't devise a title I felt captured the thought while being searchable to future SO users. Please suggest edits...

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Tyler Rinker, GSee, mnel, bmargulies, Brian Mains Nov 7 '12 at 1:59

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
that dput doesn't look like what you show for "what we start with" –  GSee Nov 6 '12 at 17:59
    
My apologies. I'll. Correct as soon we I can. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 6 '12 at 18:05
    
Is there a reason the word "likes" isn't in the desired output? –  GSee Nov 6 '12 at 18:07
    
@GSee no. Fixed that too. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 6 '12 at 18:13
1  
I'm voting to close this is too localized. I need to split the pieces up into questions. That's why I couldn't entitle it appropriately. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 6 '12 at 18:47

3 Answers 3

What about:

> tmp <- setNames(as.character(dat$text), dat$word.num)
> print(tmp, quote=FALSE)
     1      2      3      4    
 likes  water      a    bit   too.
> options(width = 80)
> print(tmp, quote=FALSE)
     1      2      3      4      5      6      7      8      9     10     11 
   The    dog   went     to    the   zoo,    but    ate first.     He  likes 
    12     13     14     15 
 water      a    bit   too. 

You could stick your own class on the object and add a print method:

class(tmp) <- "foo"
print.foo <- function(x, quote = FALSE, ...) {
  print(unclass(x), quote = quote, ...)
}
tmp

giving

> tmp
     1      2      3      4      5      6      7      8      9     10     11 
   The    dog   went     to    the   zoo,    but    ate first.     He  likes 
    12     13     14     15 
 water      a    bit   too.

One way to dump this representation to a file is via capture.output(), which has a file argument:

capture.output(tmp, file = "foo.txt")

The resulting text file contains:

$ cat foo.txt 
     1      2      3      4      5      6      7      8      9     10     11 
   The    dog   went     to    the   zoo,    but    ate first.     He  likes 
 water      a    bit   too.
    12     13     14     15 

It isn't quite what you had - the word numbers are right-aligned, but it is close.

share|improve this answer
    
terrific answer and way easier than I made it out to be. Thank you +1 –  Tyler Rinker Nov 6 '12 at 22:10
> datmat <- matrix(c(1:length(dat$text), as.character(dat$text) ), nrow=2, byrow=TRUE)
> datmat
     [,1]  [,2]  [,3]   [,4] [,5]  [,6]   [,7]  [,8]  [,9]     [,10] [,11]   [,12]   [,13] [,14] [,15] 
[1,] "1"   "2"   "3"    "4"  "5"   "6"    "7"   "8"   "9"      "10"  "11"    "12"    "13"  "14"  "15"  
[2,] "The" "dog" "went" "to" "the" "zoo," "but" "ate" "first." "He"  "likes" "water" "a"   "bit" "too."
> options(width=30)
> datmat
     [,1]  [,2]  [,3]   [,4]
[1,] "1"   "2"   "3"    "4" 
[2,] "The" "dog" "went" "to"
     [,5]  [,6]   [,7]  [,8] 
[1,] "5"   "6"    "7"   "8"  
[2,] "the" "zoo," "but" "ate"
     [,9]     [,10] [,11]  
[1,] "9"      "10"  "11"   
[2,] "first." "He"  "likes"
     [,12]   [,13] [,14]
[1,] "12"    "13"  "14" 
[2,] "water" "a"   "bit"
     [,15] 
[1,] "15"  
[2,] "too."

The quotes can be removed by coercing to a table-classed object and using print.table:

> class(datmat) <- "table"
> datmat
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,] 1    2    3    4    5   
[2,] The  dog  went to   the 
     [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]  
[1,] 6    7    8    9     
[2,] zoo, but  ate  first.
     [,10] [,11] [,12] [,13]
[1,] 10    11    12    13   
[2,] He    likes water a    
     [,14] [,15]
[1,] 14    15   
[2,] bit   too. 

You also might be able to do something with this. It fixes the left alignment problem that Gavin mentioned:

> gsub("\\[.*\\,.*\\]", "", capture.output( print(datmat, quote=FALSE) ) )
 [1] "     "                    
 [2] " 1    2    3    4    5   "
 [3] " The  dog  went to   the "
 [4] "       "                  
 [5] " 6    7    8    9     "   
 [6] " zoo, but  ate  first."   
 [7] "     "                    
 [8] " 10    11    12    13   " 
 [9] " He    likes water a    " 
[10] "     "                    
[11] " 14    15   "             
[12] " bit   too. " 

And yet a further refinement:

datlines <- gsub("\\[.*\\,.*\\]", "", capture.output( print(datmat, quote=FALSE) ) )
for( i in seq_along(datlines)){ cat(datlines[i], "\n") }
 #----------------------------------#
 1    2    3    4    5    
 The  dog  went to   the  

 6    7    8    9      
 zoo, but  ate  first. 

 10    11    12    13    
 He    likes water a     

 14    15    
 bit   too. 
share|improve this answer
1  
print(datmat, quote = FALSE) is an easier way of printing without quotes than changing the class. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 6 '12 at 19:48
    
Thanks. I had tried with rownames=FALSE and got no joy. –  BondedDust Nov 6 '12 at 19:52
    
This is the answer I utilized to make my approach. Thank you for your work. +1 –  Tyler Rinker Nov 6 '12 at 22:11
    
I improved on it. Seems complete now. –  BondedDust Nov 6 '12 at 22:31

For completeness of the thread the approach (as a function) I took using DWin's solution and a bit of Gavin's:

numbtext <- function(text.var, width=80, txt.file = NULL) {
    zz <- matrix(c(1:length(text.var), as.character(text.var) ), 
        nrow=2, byrow=TRUE)
    OW <- options()$width
    options(width=width)
    dimnames(zz) <- list(c(rep("", nrow(zz))), c(rep("", ncol(zz))))
    print(zz, quote = FALSE)
    if (!is.null(txt.file)){
        sink(file=txt.file, append = TRUE) 
        print(zz, quote = FALSE)
        sink()
    }
    options(width=OW)
}

numbtext(dat$text, 40, "foo.txt")

yielding:

 1   2   3    4  5   6    7   8  
 The dog went to the zoo, but ate

 9      10 11    12    13 14  15  
 first. He likes water a  bit too.
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