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Im reading some code, and I encountered the following ternary expression. how would you translate the following ternary operator to regular if statements?

 ( (vowel) ? ((consonant) ? "ay" : "yay") : "")
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closed as too localized by Michael Petrotta, Lion, Perception, Filburt, mata Nov 7 '12 at 0:24

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1  
This is an expression, not a statement. –  Ted Hopp Nov 6 '12 at 18:02
    
@TedHopp whats the difference? –  user133466 Nov 6 '12 at 18:02
    
Most expressions are not legal statements. Note that all the answers (so far) involve using the return statement. If you don't want to return the value of the expression, you'll need somewhere to store the value when you turn it into a statement. –  Ted Hopp Nov 6 '12 at 18:03
6  
I'm curious--what was the obstacle to figuring this out yourself? I think about reasoning about code and I'm wondering where the barrier was. To me it seems like simple de-construction. –  Dave Newton Nov 6 '12 at 18:06
1  
@user133466 Work from the inside out as with any complex expression: play parser. What would get evaluated in what order? In this case it's even easier because of the explicit parens. –  Dave Newton Nov 6 '12 at 18:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Something like this:

if(vowel) {
    if(consonant) {
        return "ay"
    } else {
        return "yay"
    }
} else {
    return ""
}

Note that I'm using return because ternary operator is an expression while if is a statement in Java, thus it doesn't have a value. You must wrap this in a method returning String.

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Work from the inside out.

if (vowel) {
    if (consonant) {
        return "ay";
    } else {
        return "yay";
    }
} else {
    return "";
}

I'd guess the original code is somehow wrong. vowel and consonant are boolean expressions, and (if I'm guessing at what the code is doing correctly) semantically a letter can't be both a vowel and a consonant. That is, the "ay" case won't be called.

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It can, this is checking for y. –  Dmitri Nov 6 '12 at 18:05

I think this conveys the intent better than nested ifs:

String str = "";
if(vowel && consonant) {
    str = "ay";
} else if(vowel) {
    str = "yay"
}
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Nested if, chained if...potayto, potahto. But +1 for not using a return statement. –  Ted Hopp Nov 6 '12 at 18:06

it will be like this

String ans = null;
if(vowel)
        {
            if(consonant)
            {
                ans="ay";
            }
            else
            {
                ans="yay";
            }
        }
        else
        {
            ans="";
        }
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This isn't legal syntax. A string expression is not a statement. –  Ted Hopp Nov 6 '12 at 18:07
    
@TedHopp - i have updated it . –  Vijay Nov 6 '12 at 18:10

Except for the () around the conditions, (vowel) and (consonant), replace

"(" by "if"
"?" by "{"
":" by "} else {"
")" by "}"

and you'll get:

if (vowel) { if (consonant) { "ay" } else { "yay" } } else { "" }

which if you run it through a beautifier or just add your own typical indenting becomes:

if (vowel) {
   if (consonant) {
      "ay"
   } else {
      "yay"
   }
} else {
   ""
}
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run it through a beautifier ... and end up with something that isn't legal syntax. –  Ted Hopp Nov 6 '12 at 18:28
    
@TedHopp: Legal syntax for what? The originally posted ternary expression wasn't "legal syntax", the OP just wanted to know what it meant so I showed him how to figure it out. How to use that information in the context of a program as "legal syntax" depends entirely on the context in which the original ternary expression is used. –  Ed Morton Nov 6 '12 at 19:17
    
@TedHopp: I see some of the other answers assume the OP was using his ternary expression in the context of a return, while others assume it's in the context of an assignment so maybe that's what you're referring to. He could also be using it in the context of a print and there are probably other alternatives. I just assumed the OP could figure out where to put the print, return, assignment, whatever once the ternary expression was broken down for him. –  Ed Morton Nov 6 '12 at 19:28
1  
Not quite - the original code isn't a legal statement, but it's a legal expression. This isn't legal anything. –  Dmitri Nov 6 '12 at 20:42
    
I think Dmitri hit it on the head. OP's code might be found somewhere in a valid Java program. Your's could never be. The array of contexts assumed in the other answers is a consequence of what I noted in my comment to OP's question. With a few exceptions (assignment, non-void function call, pre/post-increment/decrement, etc.), expressions and statements are different beasts. –  Ted Hopp Nov 6 '12 at 21:16

It translates to:

 String result = "";
    if (vowel) {
        if (consonant) {
            result = "ay";
        } else {
            result = "yay";
        }
    } else {
        result = "";
    }
share|improve this answer
    
In this else is not required. You have already set result to empty string, so why would you need to reset to empty string again... :) –  Vishal Nov 6 '12 at 19:03

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