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The goal is to create a mock class which behaves like a db resultset.

So for example, if a database query returns, using a dict expression, {'ab':100, 'cd':200}, then I would to see

>>> dummy.ab
100

So, at the beginning I thought I maybe able to do it this way

ks = ['ab', 'cd']
vs = [12, 34]
class C(dict):
    def __init__(self, ks, vs):
        for i, k in enumerate(ks):
                self[k] = vs[i]
                setattr(self, k, property(lambda x: vs[i], self.fn_readyonly))

    def fn_readonly(self, v)
        raise "It is ready only"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    c = C(ks, vs)
    print c.ab

but "c.ab" returns a property object instead.

Replace the setattr line with

k = property(lambda x: vs[i])

It is of no use at all.

So what is the right way to create an instance property in runtime?

P.S. I am aware of an alternative here

share|improve this question
1  
There are a few typos in your code: definition of fn_readonly needs a : and __init__ references self.fn_readyonly. –  mhawke Aug 25 '09 at 2:15
    
You are right. I added that setter function in last minute in order to underline the reason of creating a property in runtime. –  Anthony Kong Aug 25 '09 at 4:39

13 Answers 13

up vote 92 down vote accepted

I suppose I should expand this answer, now that I'm older and wiser and know what's going on. Better late than never.

You can add a property to a class dynamically. But that's the catch: you have to add it to the class.

>>> class Foo(object):
...     pass
... 
>>> foo = Foo()
>>> foo.a = 3
>>> Foo.b = property(lambda self: self.a + 1)
>>> foo.b
4

A property is actually a simple implementation of a thing called a descriptor. It's an object that provides custom handling for a given attribute, on a given class. Kinda like a way to factor a huge if tree out of __getattribute__.

When I ask for foo.b in the example above, Python sees that the b defined on the class implements the descriptor protocol—which just means it's an object with a __get__, __set__, or __delete__ method. The descriptor claims responsibility for handling that attribute, so Python calls Foo.b.__get__(foo, Foo), and the return value is passed back to you as the value of the attribute. In the case of property, each of these methods just calls the fget, fset, or fdel you passed to the property constructor.

Descriptors are really Python's way of exposing the plumbing of its entire OO implementation. In fact, there's another type of descriptor even more common than property.

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def bar(self):
...         pass
... 
>>> Foo().bar
<bound method Foo.bar of <__main__.Foo object at 0x7f2a439d5dd0>>
>>> Foo().bar.__get__
<method-wrapper '__get__' of instancemethod object at 0x7f2a43a8a5a0>

The humble method is just another kind of descriptor. Its __get__ tacks on the calling instance as the first argument; in effect, it does this:

def __get__(self, instance, owner):
    return functools.partial(self.function, instance)

Anyway, I suspect this is why descriptors only work on classes: they're a formalization of the stuff that powers classes in the first place. They're even the exception to the rule: you can obviously assign descriptors to a class, and classes are themselves instances of type! In fact, trying to read Foo.b still calls property.__get__; it's just idiomatic for descriptors to return themselves when accessed as class attributes.

I think it's pretty cool that virtually all of Python's OO system can be expressed in Python. :)

Oh, and I wrote a wordy blog post about descriptors a while back if you're interested.

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1  
Nice to know there is a workaround! –  Anthony Kong Aug 31 '09 at 4:39
12  
No need to add the add_property method. setattr (Foo, 'name', property (func)) –  Courtney D Jun 21 '11 at 4:53

It seems you could solve this problem much more simply with a namedtuple, since you know the entire list of fields ahead of time.

from collections import namedtuple

Foo = namedtuple('Foo', ['bar', 'quux'])

foo = Foo(bar=13, quux=74)
print foo.bar, foo.quux

foo2 = Foo()  # error

If you absolutely need to write your own setter, you'll have to do the metaprogramming at the class level; property() doesn't work on instances.

share|improve this answer
    
Great idea. Unfortunately I am stuck with python 2.4 at the moment. –  Anthony Kong Aug 25 '09 at 4:39
3  
2  
The guy who wrote namedtuple deserves a prize for making it smooth and elegant to be faithful object-oriented principles. –  Kazark Sep 11 '11 at 0:51
3  
Sorry, at best, this answer is only applicable to the special case where one wanteda class consisting of only read-only attributes all know in advance. In other words I don't think it addresses the broader question of how to add general properties -- not just read-only ones -- to a class at runtime (nor does the current version of the other "add-on" answer also posted by the author). –  martineau Mar 11 '13 at 17:15
    
@martineau so... pass more arguments to property()? there's nothing in either answer that's specific to read-only properties. –  Eevee Mar 11 '13 at 17:36

The goal is to create a mock class which behaves like a db resultset.

So what you want is a dictionary where you can spell a['b'] as a.b?

That's easy:

class atdict(dict):
    __getattr__= dict.__getitem__
    __setattr__= dict.__setitem__
    __delattr__= dict.__delitem__
share|improve this answer

You don't need to use a property for that. Just override __setattr__ to make them read only.

class C(object):
    def __init__(self, keys, values):
        for (key, value) in zip(keys, values):
            self.__dict__[key] = value

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        raise Exception("It's read only!")

Tada.

>>> c = C('abc', [1,2,3])
>>> c.a
1
>>> c.b
2
>>> c.c
3
>>> c.d
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'C' object has no attribute 'd'
>>> c.d = 42
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 6, in __setattr__
Exception: It's read only!
>>> c.a = 'blah'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 6, in __setattr__
Exception: It's read only!
share|improve this answer

Not sure if I completely understand the question, but you can modify instance properties at runtime with the built-in __dict__ of your class:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self, ks, vs):
        self.__dict__ = dict(zip(ks, vs))


if __name__ == "__main__":
    ks = ['ab', 'cd']
    vs = [12, 34]
    c = C(ks, vs)
    print(c.ab) # 12
share|improve this answer
    
In essence my question is to find out if it is possible to create a new property in runtime. The consensus seems to be negative. Your suggestion is certainly simple and practical. (Same to other answers that uses dict) –  Anthony Kong Aug 25 '09 at 4:43

You cannot add a new property() to an instance at runtime, because properties are data descriptors. Instead you must dynamically create a new class, or over getattribute in order to process data descriptors on instances.

share|improve this answer

The best way to achieve is by defining __slots__. That way your instances can't have new attributes.

ks = ['ab', 'cd']
vs = [12, 34]

class C(dict):
    __slots__ = []
    def __init__(self, ks, vs): self.update(zip(ks, vs))
    def __getattr__(self, key): return self[key]

if __name__ == "__main__":
    c = C(ks, vs)
    print c.ab

That prints 12

    c.ab = 33

That gives: AttributeError: 'C' object has no attribute 'ab'

share|improve this answer

I asked a similary question on this Stack Overflow post to create a class factory which created simple types. The outcome was this answer which had a working version of the class factory. Here is a snippet of the answer:

def Struct(*args, **kwargs):
    def init(self, *iargs, **ikwargs):
        for k,v in kwargs.items():
            setattr(self, k, v)
        for i in range(len(iargs)):
            setattr(self, args[i], iargs[i])
        for k,v in ikwargs.items():
            setattr(self, k, v)

    name = kwargs.pop("name", "MyStruct")
    kwargs.update(dict((k, None) for k in args))
    return type(name, (object,), {'__init__': init, '__slots__': kwargs.keys()})

>>> Person = Struct('fname', 'age')
>>> person1 = Person('Kevin', 25)
>>> person2 = Person(age=42, fname='Terry')
>>> person1.age += 10
>>> person2.age -= 10
>>> person1.fname, person1.age, person2.fname, person2.age
('Kevin', 35, 'Terry', 32)
>>>

You could use some variation of this to create default values which is your goal (there is also an answer in that question which deals with this).

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Only way to dynamically attach a property is to create a new class and its instance with your new property.

class Holder: p = property(lambda x: vs[i], self.fn_readonly)
setattr(self, k, Holder().p)
share|improve this answer
    
this does not appear to work. it will assign the result of the property, not the property itself. –  marshall May 15 '13 at 18:19

This seems to work(but see below):

class data(dict,object):
    def __init__(self,*args,**argd):
        dict.__init__(self,*args,**argd)
        self.__dict__.update(self)
    def __setattr__(self,name,value):
        raise AttributeError,"Attribute '%s' of '%s' object cannot be set"%(name,self.__class__.__name__)
    def __delattr__(self,name):
        raise AttributeError,"Attribute '%s' of '%s' object cannot be deleted"%(name,self.__class__.__name__)

If you need more complex behavior, feel free to edit your answer.

edit

The following would probably be more memory-efficient for large datasets:

class data(dict,object):
    def __init__(self,*args,**argd):
        dict.__init__(self,*args,**argd)
    def __getattr__(self,name):
        return self[name]
    def __setattr__(self,name,value):
        raise AttributeError,"Attribute '%s' of '%s' object cannot be set"%(name,self.__class__.__name__)
    def __delattr__(self,name):
        raise AttributeError,"Attribute '%s' of '%s' object cannot be deleted"%(name,self.__class__.__name__)
share|improve this answer

I recently ran into a similar problem, the solution that I came up with uses __getattr__ and __setattr__ for the properties that I want it to handle, everything else gets passed on to the originals.

class C(object):
    def __init__(self, properties):
        self.existing = "Still Here"
        self.properties = properties

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        if "properties" in self.__dict__ and name in self.properties:
            return self.properties[name] # Or call a function, etc
        return self.__dict__[name]

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if "properties" in self.__dict__ and name in self.properties:
            self.properties[name] = value
        else:
            self.__dict__[name] = value

if __name__ == "__main__":
    my_properties = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}
    c = C(my_properties)
    assert c.a == 1
    assert c.existing == "Still Here"
    c.b = 10
    assert c.properties['b'] == 10
share|improve this answer

Just another example how to achieve desired effect

class Foo(object):

    _bar = None

    @property
    def bar(self):
        return self._bar

    @bar.setter
    def bar(self, value):
        self._bar = value

    def __init__(self, dyn_property_name):
        setattr(Foo, dyn_property_name, Foo.bar)

So now we can do stuff like:

>>> foo = Foo('baz')
>>> foo.baz = 5
>>> foo.bar
5
>>> foo.baz
5
share|improve this answer

It is much more easier than expected. The only thing you have to do is to waste ONE line of code for defining it. So:

class struct_1: pass
struct_1.a = 1
struct_1.b = 'hello world'
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