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I have the following code

chdir("c:/perl/normalized");
$docid=0;
my %hash = ();
@files = <*>;
foreach $file (@files) 
  {
    $docid++;
    open (input, $file);    
    while (<input>) 
      {
    open (output,'>>c:/perl/tokens/total');
    chomp;
    (@words) = split(" ");  
    foreach $word (@words)
    {
    push @{ $hash{$word} }, $docid;

    }
      }
   }
foreach $key (sort keys %hash) {
    print output"$key : @{ $hash{$key} }\n";
}


close (input);
close (output);

This is a sample output in a file

of : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

it is true since the term "of" for example existed 10(ten ones) times in the first document however is there a way to remove the repeated values; i.e instead of ten ones I want just one Thank you for your help

share|improve this question
    
Before adding it, check if it's already in the hash. Or am I missing something here? –  Madbreaks Nov 6 '12 at 18:31
    
It has been asked before. Please do a search before posting another question of the same ilk. –  hd1 Nov 6 '12 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To avoid adding the dups in the first place, change

foreach $word (@words)

to

foreach $word (uniq @words)

If you want to leave the dups in the data structure, instead change

print output"$key : @{ $hash{$key} }\n";

to

print output "$key : ", join(" ", uniq @{ $hash{$key} }), "\n";

uniq is provided by List::MoreUtils.

use List::MoreUtils qw( uniq );

Or you can use

sub uniq { my %seen; grep !$seen{$_}++, @_ }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much it worked –  user1804029 Nov 6 '12 at 23:05
    
IS there a way to keep a counter for the removed duplicates? –  user1804029 Nov 7 '12 at 8:57
    
Best bet might be to use a hash instead of an array, and maintain a count as the value of the hash. ++$hash{$word}{$docid}; Use keys to get the doc ids. You'll lose the order, but it can easily be restored using a numerical sort. –  ikegami Nov 7 '12 at 9:01
    
I am already using a hash!! –  user1804029 Nov 7 '12 at 9:03
    
No. You're storing the doc id in an array value ($hash{$word}[$i] = $docid;). I suggested you store it in a hash key ($hash{$word}{$docid} = $count;), and I showed you how to do it. –  ikegami Nov 7 '12 at 9:15

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