Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to learn to code using intrinsics and below is a code which does addition

compiler used: icc

#include<stdio.h>
#include<emmintrin.h>
int main()
{
        __m128i a = _mm_set_epi32(1,2,3,4);
        __m128i b = _mm_set_epi32(1,2,3,4);
        __m128i c;
        c = _mm_add_epi32(a,b);
        printf("%d\n",c[2]);
        return 0;
}

I get the below error:

test.c(9): error: expression must have pointer-to-object type
        printf("%d\n",c[2]);

How do I print the values in the variable c which is of type __m128i

share|improve this question
    
Also note that __m128i doesn't have any info on the type that is being stored. It could be 8-bit ints, 16-bit ints, 32-bit, etc... Some compilers support the .m128i_i32 field extensions. But it's definitely not standard and not in GCC. – Mysticial Nov 6 '12 at 18:59
1  
related to the title: how to print __uint128_t number using gcc? – J.F. Sebastian Nov 6 '12 at 19:00
1  
Note that some compilers have built-in printf support for SIMD types, e.g. Apple's versions of gcc, clang, etc, all support %vld for printing an __m128i as 4 x 32 bit ints. – Paul R Nov 6 '12 at 19:12
    
I'm using intel compiler – arunmoezhi Nov 6 '12 at 19:15
    
Is there a way to do masked addition. Say I would like to store only the alternate elements (c[0],c[2])? – arunmoezhi Nov 6 '12 at 19:18
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Use this function to print them:

void print128_num(__m128i var)
{
    uint16_t *val = (uint16_t*) &var;
    printf("Numerical: %i %i %i %i %i %i %i %i \n", 
           val[0], val[1], val[2], val[3], val[4], val[5], 
           val[6], val[7]);
}

You split 128bits into 16-bits(or 32-bits) before printing them.

This is a way of 64-bit splitting and printing if you have 64-bit support available:

void print128_num(__m128i var) 
{
    int64_t *v64val = (int64_t*) &var;
    printf("%.16llx %.16llx\n", v64val[1], v64val[0]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Replace llx with lld if u want int. – askmish Nov 6 '12 at 18:52
    
it works. I used uint32_t to print the 32-bit integers. But the output is reversed. Instead of 2,4,6,8 i get 8,6,4,2. Does _mm_add_epi32 store the values in reverse order? – arunmoezhi Nov 6 '12 at 19:00
    
Did you read Endian-ness? – askmish Nov 6 '12 at 19:10
    
oops!! i got it now :) – arunmoezhi Nov 6 '12 at 19:15
3  
Is this pointer aliasing legal? – Nate Eldredge Apr 16 at 16:14

I know this question is tagged C, but it was the best search result also when looking for a C++ solution to the same problem.

So, this could be a C++ implementation:

#include <string>
#include <sstream>

#if defined(__SSE2__)
template <typename T>
std::string __m128i_toString(const __m128i var) {
    std::stringstream sstr;
    const T* values = (const T*) &var;
    if (sizeof(T) == 1) {
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(__m128i); i++) {
            sstr << (int) values[i] << " ";
        }
    } else {
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(__m128i) / sizeof(T); i++) {
            sstr << values[i] << " ";
        }
    }
    return sstr.str();
}
#endif

Usage:

#include <iostream>
[..]
__m128i x
[..]
std::cout << __m128i_toString<uint8_t>(x) << std::endl;
std::cout << __m128i_toString<uint16_t>(x) << std::endl;
std::cout << __m128i_toString<uint32_t>(x) << std::endl;
std::cout << __m128i_toString<uint64_t>(x) << std::endl;

Result:

141 114 0 0 0 0 0 0 151 104 0 0 0 0 0 0
29325 0 0 0 26775 0 0 0
29325 0 26775 0
29325 26775
share|improve this answer
    
Why downvoted ? – Antonio Apr 20 at 13:53
#include<stdio.h>
#include<emmintrin.h>
int main()
{
    __m128i a = _mm_set_epi32(1,2,3,4);
    __m128i b = _mm_set_epi32(1,2,3,4);
    __m128i c;

    const int32_t* q; 
    //add a pointer 
    c = _mm_add_epi32(a,b);

    q = (const int32_t*) &c;
    printf("%d\n",q[2]);
    //printf("%d\n",c[2]);
    return 0;
}

Try this code.

share|improve this answer
2  
This code aliases pointers. Are you sure it is legal? – Nate Eldredge Apr 16 at 16:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.