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In my experience, the real world rarely provides for indexes of nonnegative integers. Many things aren't even represented numerically. And many things with a numerically-represented index don't begin their indexes at 0. Why then are we still limited to integer-indexed arrays?

Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems like enum indexed arrays are often more appropriate than numerically-indexed arrays (as enums are often more accurate, "real-world" representations). While enums can often be translated into C-style array indices with relative ease...

enum Weekday = {
    SUNDAY,
    MONDAY,
    TUESDAY,
    WEDNESDAY,
    THURSDAY,
    FRIDAY,
    SATURDAY
}

// hopefully C doesn't allow nonsequential enum values; else pray to God
// no one does something like setting Sunday = 4 and Saturday = 4096
int numberOfDays = Saturday-Sunday+1;

int hoursWorkedPerDay[numberOfDays];

hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)SUNDAY] = 0;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)MONDAY] = 8;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)TUESDAY] = 10;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)WEDNESDAY] = 6;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)THURSDAY] = 8;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)FRIDAY] = 8;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)SATURDAY] = 0;

...we are still required to maintain consistency between the number of enums and the size of the array (however, this isn't an awful solution because there's not a more valid integer mapping for "SUNDAY" than 0), and more importantly, anything that can be cast to an int could still be dropped into the index to manipulate the array:

// continued from above
void resetHours (void) {
    int i = 0;
    int hours = 0;
    for (i = 0; i<numberOfDays; i++) {
        hoursWorkedPerDay[hours] = i;
        // oops, should have been: "...[i] = hours;"
        // an enum-indexed implementation would have caught this
        // during compilation
    }
}

Furthermore, the entire conversion from enum to int is an entire layer of complexity that seems unnecessary.

Can someone please explain whether there is validity to enum-indices, and list some pros and cons to each approach? And perhaps why a feature so seemingly useful is missing from the C standard, if such information exists?

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closed as not constructive by Kay, Daniel Fischer, Bo Persson, Adam Rosenfield, Simone Nov 6 '12 at 18:49

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2  
"hopefully C doesn't allow nonsequential enum values;" <- It soo does. (Also negative enum values.) –  Daniel Fischer Nov 6 '12 at 18:42
1  
And thank God it does. How would you implement an enumeration that is meant to be used as a bit mask otherwise? –  Ed S. Nov 6 '12 at 18:45
1  
This is another implementation of dictionary - translating property key (enumerated index) to property value (table value). –  pro_metedor Nov 6 '12 at 18:47
    
There's an integer promotion from enum to int in C++11 for unscoped enums with fixed underlying type (§4.6/4 conv.prom). –  dyp Nov 6 '12 at 18:49
1  
You should focus on either C or C++ or split it to 2 questions. There are different answers for each of the languages. –  icepack Nov 6 '12 at 18:49

3 Answers 3

Sunday =0 //by default, if you won't mention explicit value then it would take 0

and Saturday = 6 // as in your example

so

int numberOfDays = Saturday-Sunday; // which is 6 

int hoursWorkedPerDay[numberOfDays]; 

array will have only 6 places to hold the value.

hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)SUNDAY] = 0;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)MONDAY] = 8;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)TUESDAY] = 10;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)WEDNESDAY] = 6;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)THURSDAY] = 8;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)FRIDAY] = 8;
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)SATURDAY] = 0;  

accessing out of array index (which is 6) is undefined behaviour

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I did exactly this in my example... –  weberc2 Nov 6 '12 at 19:22
    
read the last line of my answer .. you did exactly that's why it's undefined behaviour –  Omkant Nov 6 '12 at 19:26
    
Where did I try to access an index greater than 6? Furthermore, index out of bounds behavior wasn't exactly my point, but it does go to show that an enum-indexed array wouldn't have to worry about that. –  weberc2 Nov 6 '12 at 19:39
    
you are not seeing my answer properly. you have created array of size 6 so you can't access a[6], because 5 is the last valid index and after that accessing is undefined behaviour. I think you understand –  Omkant Nov 6 '12 at 19:41
1  
hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)SATURDAY] = 0; //what does this line mean ? Sateurady is 6 right ? –  Omkant Nov 6 '12 at 19:49

If you really want to use the enum as index you should declare the integer values explicitly.

On the other hand I personally would prefer s.th. type safe (i.e. without the ugly cast, that might even not be necessary), like:

std::map<Weekday,int> hoursWorkedPerDay;
share|improve this answer

You can map enum values as well:

enum Weekday = {
    SUNDAY = 1,
    MONDAY = 2,
    TUESDAY = 3,
    WEDNESDAY = 4,
    THURSDAY = 5,
    FRIDAY = 6,
    SATURDAY = 7
}

Enumeration would increase code readability while does not affect performance. In the modern IDE environments like MSVC or XCode, they improves autocomplete as well.

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1  
This doesn't really address the issue as it isn't more valuable for me to begin indexing at 1 than it is to begin at 0. There is still no more safety and the complexity of mapping to and from integers remains. –  weberc2 Nov 6 '12 at 19:21
    
+1 brilliant solution... –  PiotrNycz Nov 6 '12 at 19:59
    
@PiotrNycz But just wasting memory, isn't it? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 6 '12 at 22:16
    
@g-makulik what kind of memory is wasted here? My point is that it is easier and no cost to say SUNDAY (I would add suffix _WORKING_HOUR) - than hoursWorkedPerDay[(int)SUNDAY]... –  PiotrNycz Nov 6 '12 at 22:25
1  
@g-makulik it's time for me to get glasses. I wrongly assumed the answer which came to my mind: enum WeekWorkingHours { SUNDAY_WH=0, MONDAY_WH=8, TUESDAY_WH=8, ...., FRIDAY_WH=8, SATURDAY_WH=0 }; and an easy usage by #define WH_PER_DAY(day) day##_WH --> WH_PER_DAY(MONDAY)... SUNDAY and FRIDAY met my assumption, I overlooked the rest. So the solution is not briliant... –  PiotrNycz Nov 6 '12 at 23:28

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